Course Descriptions

har-summer-online-iconSummer Sessions 2017
Course Offerings

Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3

Registration Payment
Session 1 – June 5 to June 30, 2017
 
ARTH 213: Introduction to Digital Media
BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
BUSA 101: Introduction to Business
CISC 106: Business Computing


ENGL 250: The Art of the Short Story

ENGL 250: Writing the Spiritual Autobiography
MUSI 106: Learning About Music
PHIL 250: Contemporary Ethical Issues
POSC 105: International Relations
PHYS 121: Astronomy
SOCI 111: Controversial Social Issues

ARTH 213: Introduction to Digital Media
4 credits, Humanities, EL

Digital media plays an important role in today’s society. Digital images, video, and the web have all become important devices for communication across all disciplines. Introduction to Digital Media is a beginning digital arts course that introduces the three main aspects of digital media to students through the use of Adobe Photoshop. Print media is explored through image manipulation and graphic design. Time based media is experienced through frame by frame animation and 3D design through software creation and printing. The class will consider digital media’s effect on society through appropriation and remixing, truth vs perception, and virtual memory.

This course is taught by J. Von Stengel, Department of Art.


BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 credits, Physical and Life Sciences lab

How is the human body structured, from the smallest components to the whole body? What happens when the components of the body, such as molecules and cells, don’t develop properly, or are not produced in the right number? How might those circumstances be associated with disease? If the structure of the human body, and what happens when the structure is abnormal, intrigues you, this course may be for you.

This course is taught by A.J. Russo, Department of Biology.


BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
3 credits, Physical and Life Sciences
Prerequisites: NURS134, NURS234, BIOL206 & 207, CHEM105

This course is designed to examine specific diseases from a physiologic and developmental perspective. Mechanisms of disease, etiology, manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions are reviewed. This content will serve as a foundation for addressing therapeutic interventions related to specific disease states.

Student-centered learning aids about the most essential and challenging concepts in pathophysiology are embedded in the online modules to enhance learning and mastery of the content; graphics to clarify the content, animations to define pathophysiologic processes in a dynamic way, pre-tests and interactive self-assessment exercises for content review, audio glossary, and discussion forums to encourage interaction between classmates. Case studies are used extensively to provide application of content to a clinical situation. This course will integrate your knowledge and skills into a creative and engaging community of online learners. Moreover, multimedia instructional technology will be used to foster and enhance faculty-student engagement.

This course is taught by M. Syed, Department of Biology.


BUSA 101: Introduction to Business
4 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences, EL

Introduction to the various functional areas of business, including marketing, finance, operations, management, and strategy. Specific topics covered include basic financial analysis, forms of business ownership, managerial decision making, and business ethics in a local, national, and international context. Includes a significant experiential learning component. No prerequisite.

This course is taught by P. Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.


CISC 106: Business Computing
3 credits, QFR

Learn to use the software you will encounter in almost every office environment. Business computing is a computer literacy course providing an introduction to the nature and use of computers and software in a business environment. Topics include information processing and how to use computers in problem solving in the business world. Students learn to create and use spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software to solve business problems and present their findings. This course is for students not planning to major or minor in computer or information science.

This course is taught by K. Britton, Department of Computer Science.


ENGL 250: The Art of the Short Story
3 credits, Humanities

Distinctly modern in character, the short story bears the hallmarks (dissonance, ambiguity, disorientation born of elliptical elision) of the turn-of-the-century age in which its formal features were sophisticated. This summer online course will examine the short story in all of its imaginative aesthetic and formal dynamism. In addition to looking at precursor versions of the genre—the fable, the medieval romance or tale—readers will consider the formal effects distinguishing the short stories of such writers as Ambrose Bierce, Jorge Luis Borges, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ernest Hemingway, Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, Herman Melville, Alice Munro, Edgar Allan Poe, James Thurber, H. G. Wells, Edith Wharton, Alice Walker. Each student will write three brief analytical essays; will actively participate in a discussion thread; and will take a final examination.

This course is taught by S. Navarette, Department of English.


ENGL 250: Writing the Spiritual Autobiography
3 credits
 
In this course, we will read and write about the trajectory of one’s spiritual life. Through a series of writing experiments, you will uncover material from early childhood to present that helps you to explore your journey from belief to non-belief or vice versa. Writing a spiritual autobiography allows you to explore who you once were and who you are now. It is not necessarily a journey that concerns an organized religion, but rather a chance to examine what you truly believe.
 
We will read excerpts from some of the seminal spiritual autobiographies and write our own. As much as possible, we will use the interactive quality of the on-line discussion forum and real-time technology to support the intimacy of the writing workshop experience.
 
In this course students will gain an understanding of the craft of creating a work of literary non-fiction; the personal essay form and structure; how to use precise description and detail to create compelling scenes; the tools of revision and how to be your own best editor; the art of civil and sensitive critique.
 
This course is taught by A. Lichtenstein, Department of English.


MUSI 106: Learning About Music
3 credits, Humanities

You listen to music every day, but are you hearing it? Do you really know why you like some styles and not others? Did you know that there are many types of music, from America, Europe and around the world, some going back centuries, which you would probably enjoy listening to were you to discover them? This course will make you a more avid, more intent, and more informed listener. This course will introduce you to new forms and styles of music, and it will help you make better sense of the music you hear. You will learn how and why our culture and other cultures make music and how different types of music are organized. Appreciation of any art form comes from a combination of interest and understanding, and developing your interest in music into appreciation through greater understanding is what this course is all about.

This course is taught by B. Aldridge, Department of Music.


PHIL 250: Contemporary Ethical Issues
3 credits, Humanities

Are you living an ethical life? Is it possible to live an ethical life in today’s world?

We live in the most affluent society in the history of the world. Our wealth, technological achievements, and consumerist lifestyles have created a series of ethical challenges that are unprecedented: global warming, genetic engineering, unprecedented economic inequality, massive digital surveillance, over-population, chronic obesity, the creation of super-viruses, and so much more. Our challenges are so significant that some think we’re doomed—and that we simply cannot continue to live as we do.

This course will explore many of the ethical issues that we now face and will be forced to face in coming decades. We will consider a number of points of view, as well as possible solutions, to some of the ethical challenges confronting us in our daily lives. Students will write short essays, take several short quizzes, and participate in regular discussion and debate in an online format.

The course is taught by J. Wisnewski, Department of Philosophy.


PHYS 121: Astronomy
4 credits, Physical and Life Sciences lab

Have you ever looked up at the sky at night and wondered about the lives of those twinkly points of light in the sky? Have you ever wanted to take pictures of the birthplaces of those lights in the sky? Do you think you would enjoy using robot-controlled telescopes or participating in studies using pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope and other state-of-the-art devices? Finally, would you like do those things from the comfort of your home and in your pajamas? If you answered yes to any of those questions and are looking to complete a laboratory course, then PHYS 121: Astronomy online is just the thing for you.

This course is taught by K. Schultz, Department of Physics.

 

Session 2 – July 3 to July 28, 2017
 

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
BUSA 343: Social Media Marketing
ECON 102: Macroeconomic Principles
CISC 118: Game Programming

INTR 160: Introduction to Global Studies
MUSI 176: Rock Music History
PHIL 236: Logic

Registration Payment

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 credits, Physical and Life Sciences lab
Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 206)

How are the various organ systems—such as the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems—in the human body put together? How do the systems work together to make sure the whole body functions the way it should? What happens when a body system or a group of body systems fails to work properly, such as failures that might result in a stroke or heart attack? If these questions intrigue you, this course may be of interest to you.

This course is taught A. J. Russo, Department of Biology.


BUSA 343: Social Media Marketing
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Prerequisite: Marketing (BUSA 240)

A recent survey of the 100 largest Fortune Global 500 companies, public relations firm Burson-Marsteller (www.burson-marsteller.com) found that more than three-quarters (79%) of the top 100 companies are using at least one of the four social media platforms: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, or corporate blogs. The study reported that people are following companies for news and information about the company, products, and promotions, to offer feedback, and to engage customer service. In another study, eMarketer1 reports that the US social media advertising spending will hit $2.0 billion.

Clearly, social media marketing has emerged as an important marketing strategy. Students will be introduced to various social media outlets, measurement tools including, Hootsuite, tweetdeck, Sprinklr, and Technorati, and strategic media marketing strategies. Real life case examples will be used throughout this online course.

This course is taught by P. Stamp, Business Administration and Accounting Department.


ECON 102: Macroeconomic Principles
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Macroeconomic Principles shows students how to analyze the national economy of the United States. Key understandings include: how long-run economic growth works, how the business cycle affects the national economy, an introduction to the U.S. banking and financial systems, and government policies that can be used to promote economic growth and correct the harmful changes that occur with inflation and unemployment. Alternating periods of expansion and contraction in the United States economy mean that it is important to understand how such changes affect our lives.

The Macroeconomic Principles course has three main objectives. Our first is to discover the language of economics, which helps to develop a lifelong ability to think like an economist, and to act strategically in our best interest. Our second is to acquire a theoretical and historical understanding of how markets work to the benefit and detriment of the economy, families, and individuals. Our final objective is to discuss the relevance of macroeconomic principles to contemporary issues that have considerable consequences in the United States.

This class will be highly interactive, as we learn how economic principles explain the causes and consequences of beneficial and harmful changes in the national economy. Students will walk away with a strong understanding of how to make great strategic decisions in their lives; including the best times to buy or sell stocks, college educations, homes, and automobiles.

This class is taught by L. Malone, Department of Economics.


INTR 160: Introduction to Global Studies
3 credits, Humanities

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary perspectives on global systems using concepts such as diversity, tradition, hybrid or blended identities, and tolerance. It seeks to help students find ways to work respectfully and productively in an interconnected world.  Students who complete this course and either 101 or 102 in CHIN, FREN, GERM or SPAN will fulfill the language requirement.

This course is taught by M. Wolff, Department of Modern Languages.


 

MUSI 176: Rock Music History
3 credits, Humanities

Contract a “Social Disease!” Popular culture rocks our cradle, permeates society, and our interaction with others. The powers that be attempt to electrify our surroundings with high voltage presentations of their products and jolt our necessity for them. Without us knowing it, they can manipulate our tastes and perceptions of ourselves. Steve Markuson’s new personalized text, “Rock on the Roll, Serving Up Popular Culture”, puts a twist on the creation and deflation of pop music icons and provides unusual insight into those who fill us with “The Desire of Necessity”—igniting our imaginations, designing decades, and choosing which musicians will represent the dynamics of a generation.

“Rock On-Line for Summer 2017”—while surveying American history and culture through the lens of popular music, this course allows students to create a personal response to the music around them, past and present. Students will offer personal input into the class through concert reviews, discussions of performances and performers, and appraisals of Pop Culture.

This course is taught by S. Markuson, Music Department.


PHIL 236: Logic
3 credits, Humanities, QFR

Do you trust your ability to reason? When you provide evidence for a claim, how good is your logic? It’s easy to feel confident, but we often over-estimate our abilities. In fact, our reasoning is routinely sloppy. On the one hand, we make inferences where we shouldn’t, or deduce things that can’t be deduced. On the other hand, formal logic has been crucial in the development of much modern technology (like the computer you are using now). Logic matters. It’s worth being good at it.

Logic is the science of argument—of premise and conclusion. It examines the structure of good reasoning and attempts to formalize it in a way that eliminates error. This course will be an introduction to Logic, so understood. While we will begin with the basics of argument, we will quickly immerse ourselves in sentential logic, learning a system of inferential rules and methods for proving the validity (or invalidity) of arguments. We will also introduce predicate logic. Finally, we will spend some time considering the fallacies (errors in reasoning), both formal and informal.

You will complete this course in a collaborative online environment. The course involves numerous online exercises, as well as readings and participation in discussion boards. There is a heavy emphasis on doing formal logic rather than studying formal logic. The course thus involves lots of practice problems, where students are encouraged to help each other work through the more challenging problems together.

The course is taught by J. Wisnewski, Department of Philosophy.


POSC 105: International Relations
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Level 3

Is Russia meddling in US elections? What drives global terrorism? Why did voters in the United Kingdom vote to leave the European Union? Will the current slowdown in global trade continue?
This course will use contemporary case studies to illuminate issues at the core of international relations and to explore how theories developed within the academic study of international relations relate to the world of international politics. Additionally, through our Statecraft simulation, you will take on the role of a foreign policy decision-maker and will be forced to take action amidst the complexity of world politics and the demands of your population. Individual and group reflection exercises will connect your experience in the simulation to the theory and real world cases we are engaging.

This course is taught by A. Forster Rothbart, Department of Political Science.


PSYC 304: Cognitive Psychology
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course covers the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge. Topics include perception, attention, pattern recognition, imagery, memory, problem solving, knowledge, reasoning, and decision making. Prerequisites: PSYC 110, 111, and at least a C+ in PSYC 290.

This course is taught by L. Onorato, Department of Psychology.


SOCI 105: Introduction to Sociology
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
Why do we act the way we do? What lies behind our assumptions, motivations, beliefs and actions? In this course, we will explore the links between personal experience and wider social forces. Students will investigate how culture, class, race, gender, family, education, and government interrelate to create their day-to-day experience of being alive. Students will be introduced to the basic foundations of sociology, including its development as a field of inquiry, early sociological theory, and methodology. Special attention will be paid to both the local and global forces that shape social life. Assigned readings and films will set the context for the lectures and serve as the basis for discussion.
 
This course is taught by C. Walsh-Russo, Department of Sociology.


SOCI 111: Controversial Social Issues
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
We live in a world beset by social issues, which we confront almost every day. In numerous ways and to varying degrees these social concerns—or, ‘social problems’ since the things this course explores are defined as problematic—undermine individual and societal well-being. Such concerns are widely discussed in news and social media as well as in political debates, and include poverty, unemployment, homelessness, addiction, discrimination crime, violence, environmental degradation, climate change, and much more.
What are the causes of social problem and how do we go about finding them? Can we discover helpful solutions? Although the effects of such problems influence the behavior of individuals, sociologists suggest that the origins and causes of social problems lie outside of individuals.
 
This course explores a variety of contemporary social problems by applying sociological insights and techniques, which not only examine the causes and consequences of some of the most troubling social problems, but also take a critical look at our own perceptions of these problems.
 
This course is taught by E. Chernyak, Department of Sociology.


SPAN 160: Introduction to Regional Hispanic Studies
3 credits, Humanities
Satisfies LNC

What is the first thing that comes to mind when I say “Spanish?” What imagery does Latin America evoke? Who or what do you imagine when you hear the words Latino, Spaniard, and Hispanic? In this course we will answer these questions and many more.

We will challenge our preconceived notions about and gain a better understanding of the heterogeneous cultural landscape of the Spanish-speaking world. Through a general overview of the main socio-political, cultural, and regional topics of today’s Latin America and Spain, we will evaluate the historical and cultural influences that shaped these regions. We will explore how Hispanic cultures have been influenced by common histories, reciprocal relationships, collaboration and conflicts. This exploration will take place through film, literature, current news, history, music and scholarly articles. All students will be encouraged to contribute their unique research interests and perspectives so we can engage in a lively and meaningful conversation.

This course is taught by K. Walker, Department of Modern Languages.

Session 3 – July 31 to August 24, 2017
 

BUSA 230: Organizational Behavior
ENGL 200: Business Writing
HUMA 150: Pop Culture in the Digital Age

MATH 100: Algebra Review
PSYC 304: Cognitive Psychology
THEA 350: Theatre for Social Change

Registration Payment

BUSA 230: Organizational Behavior
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Understanding the ways that individuals and groups interact can be critical to addressing the challenges faced by any organization. For example, why would employees interfere with an organization’s efforts to improve? One possibility: fear. Fear of change, of losing a job, of losing relevance.

Organizational behavior refers to the ways individuals and groups interact within and toward an organization. Combined behaviors create a company climate that can bolster or undermine an organization’s success. To understand organizational behavior we must try to understanding how individuals, groups, and organizational structures interact and affect one another. A detailed look at workplace behavior, business culture, and organizational practices can generate greater insights about communication patterns, for example, or where conflict comes from. In this class students learn to understand organizational behavior, and how to be that manager who sparks solution-oriented policies and leads positive organizational change.

This course is taught by P. Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.


 

ENGL 200: Business Writing
3 credits

Study of the strategies of effective, tactful writing in a business setting. Students will practice writing memos, letters and brief reports and discussing challenges, strategies, and problem solving in a group (corporate) setting. The course covers internal organizational communication as well as external communications with customers, clients or other firms or agencies. Limited to 20. Does not count toward the English major or toward the minor in literature.

This course taught by M. Christiansen, Department of English


HUMA 150: Pop Culture in the Digital Age
3 credits, Humanities

This course is open to all students and will emphasize the intersection of popular culture and digital technologies. In today’s globalized open market, video games, social media, the music industry, Hollywood, television, works of fiction, comic books, and celebrity tabloids are all embracing digital technologies as a way to extend their reach. Even children’s coloring books are integrating digital technology into their products by utilizing augmented reality. This class will serve as an introduction to the field of digital humanities. Students will read introductory texts on the digital humanities, engage with examples of popular, digital culture, and come to understand the extensive impact that digital technologies have had on nearly everything in the entertainment industry.

This course taught by C. Wagenheim, Department of English


MATH 100: Algebra Review
3 credits

Intended to provide the background necessary for Math 120 Precalculus. Topics covered include properties of real numbers, exponents, and radicals; operations involving polynomials and other algebraic expressions; solving equations and inequalities. Other topics may be included if time permits. The course should be taken only by students who intend to take Math 120 Precalculus. This course cannot be used to satisfy QFR requirement and does not count toward a mathematics major or minor.

This course taught by M. Chung, Department of Mathematics

 


THEA 350: Theatre for Social Change
4 credits, Humanities, EL, WL3
 
This course introduces the theory and practice of using theatre to promote social change through community engagement and the exploration contemporary issues.  In Theatre for Social Change, students will explore the current and historical practices of Theatre for Development, Theatre in Education, Playback Theatre and Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed. Through classroom and community projects, students learn to apply various forms of performance activism to issues pertinent to their own lives, gaining real-world experience in proposal writing, project development, and workshop facilitation. Final performance pieces will be performed during the “Real Deal” portion of Hartwick’s Welcome Weekend.
 
The final week of the course takes place as a required, one-week residency during Welcome Weekend Summer 2017. Prerequisite: THEA 120 (or permission of instructor).
 
This course is taught by M. Kano-White, Theatre Department and H. Tanner, Office of Health Promotion.

Back To Top