Contact Us & Honors FAQs

Do you have a question?  Check our FAQs below or contact us!

Co-Directors

Our Honors Program is directed by Dr. Lisle Dalton, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Dr. Kristin Jones, Associate Professor of Economics. Dr. Dalton and Dr. Jones are available to provide students with guidance about starting an honors challenge and completing all necessary requirements.  Both Dr. Dalton and Dr. Jones are available via phone or email and keep regular office hours.

Kristin Jones
Associate Professor of Economics
Golisano Hall 227
607-431-4941
jonesk@hartwick.edu

Lisle Dalton
Associate Professor of Religious Studies
Golisano Hall 131
607-431-4936
daltonl@hartwick.edu

Beverly Vigna
Honors Program Administrative Assistant
Office of Academic Affairs
Bresee 205
607-431-4409
vignab@hartwick.edu

 

FAQs

How do I join the Honors Program?
To whom do I speak for more information about the Honors Program?
Whom do I contact to obtain a brochure, proposal form, abstract, or other material related to the Honors Program?
What are the advantages of belonging to the Honors Program?
What if I decide to leave the Honors Program?
How long do I have to complete the Honors requirement?
What happens if my grade point average slips below a 3.5?
How does an Honor Student go about completing an Honors Challenge?

Q: How do I join the Honors Program?
A: Check our Join Us Page.

Q: To whom do I speak for more information about the Honors Program?
A: Contact one of the Co-Directors: Dr. Lisle Dalton or Dr. Kristin Jones

Q: Whom do I contact to obtain a brochure, proposal form, abstract, or other material related to the Honors Program?
A: See the Honors Administrative Assistant, Beverly Vigna in the Office of Academic Affairs on the second floor of Bresee Hall. Other materials can be found on the Honors Forms webpage or on the D2L Homepage for Honors.

Q: What are the advantages of belonging to the Honors Program?
A: The main advantage is having various opportunities to enrich your liberal arts curriculum and undertake research and creative projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Other perks that come from membership in the Honors Program are listed here.

Q: What if I decide to leave the Honors Program?
A: There is no penalty for leaving the Honors Program. Occasionally students find that their responsibilities and commitments do not allow them to complete the requirements of the Honors Program. In such cases, all they need to do is inform the Honors Program Secretary or Co-Directors of their decision to leave the program.

Q: How long do I have to complete the Honors requirement?
A: You have until May of your senior year to complete all the requirements of the Honors Program.

Q: What happens if my Grade Point Average slips below a 3.5?
A: An Honors Student is not automatically dropped from the program when his or her Grade Point Average (G.P.A.) dips slightly below a 3.5.  Students whose overall GPA falls below 3.5 are placed on probation for one semester.  If their GPA rises above 3.5 by the end of the probationary semester, they are removed from probation. If their GPA remains below 3.5 for two consecutive semesters, they are dismissed from the program.  However, any dismissed student can request to rejoin the program if their GPA rises back to 3.5

Q: How does an Honor Student go about completing an Honors Challenge?
Step 1
Typically you will propose doing an Honors Challenge on an issue or topic related to a course in which you’re currently enrolled or which you have recently completed. Ideally, you would initiate this conversation well in advance of the deadline for proposals, which is October 10th.

Step 2
The next step is to frame the topic as a clear, specific question or hypothesis, so that the research will produce a conclusion, thesis, or position rather than merely a description or summary of information. (for example, a library research paper must be an analysis or interpretation, not just a synthesis of facts.)

Working extensively with your faculty supervisor, you develop a debatable, narrowly focused hypothesis or question. Doing this can save time and energy later in the project. It’s also a good idea to identify a cluster of well-defined objectives and the specific activities that will be undertaken to achieve the goals of the challenge. Be certain that, at the start, you and your faculty supervisor agree on the scope, aim, methods, readings, and products.

Step 3
Then you write a proposal stating the issue or problem, the question or hypothesis, and the methods and approaches, and final product of the research or creative work. Though outcomes should be included, articulating a definite conclusion at this early stage would be premature. A complete list of works to be read must also be included in the proposal.

Step 4
The proposal needs to be signed by your faculty supervisor after you’ve made any necessary revisions. Next, post the proposal on the honors database and submit it to the Honors Administrative Assistant, Beverly Vigna, Bresee Room 205.

Step 5
After the work is completed, you need to write an abstract that clearly and briefly describes what was accomplished. The abstract’s introduction explains the issue or central problem, and states the question or hypothesis. The abstract summarizes the methods or creative work involved, the related challenges or topics, and the results or final product. Ideally the abstract ends with comments about the project’s relevance to your liberal arts education and future intellectual endeavors.

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