• Hartwick student in chemistry lab
  • Hartwick student in chemistry lab
  • Chemistry professor with student
  • Chemistry professor with student

Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Environmental Chemistry Courses

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The list of chemistry and biochemistry courses shown below includes the term that each lecture-based course is typically offered.  Students interested in research courses (CHEM 292, 391, 392) should contact a member of the chemistry faculty.  Senior chemistry and biochemistry students should consult with their thesis advisor on CHEM, BIOC, or ENCH 490 enrollment.

Chemistry Courses:

100 Chemistry in Today's Society (Fall, January, Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
Selected areas of chemistry designed to enable the student to understand better the role of chemistry and technology in modern society. The course will examine such areas as polymers, and their role in everyday products; acids and bases in household products; radioactivity, its use and abuse; and petrochemicals, energy and other uses. Open only to students with no college chemistry credit. (SCI)

102 Chemistry in Today's Society (Fall, January, Spring)
4 credits, 3 one-hour lectures and 1 two-hour laboratory weekly.
Selected areas of chemistry designed to enable the student to understand better the role of chemistry and technology in modern society. The course will examine such areas as polymers, and their role in everyday products; acids and bases in household products; radioactivity, its use and abuse; and petrochemicals, energy and other uses. This course also includes a laboratory component where students will explore and apply chemical concepts in a laboratory setting. Open only to students with no college chemistry credit. (LAB)

105 Fundamentals of General, Organic and Biological Chemistry (Spring)
4 credits, 3 one-hour lectures and 1 three-hour laboratory weekly.
An introduction to those basic principles and facts needed for an understanding of the chemistry of the human body, in particular, and of life systems, in general. This course is designed primarily for persons preparing for or continuing in the humanities or social sciences who are interested in health-related topics and who desire a broader survey of chemistry than is usually provided by a traditional chemistry course. Major areas are: some background principles apply to all chemistry, some background chemistry of carbon compounds (organic) and the fundamentals of human biochemistry. Prerequisite: high school chemistry and algebra. (LAB)

107, 108 General Chemistry (Fall, Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures, 1 three hour laboratory weekly. 
Basic principles and calculations of chemistry. Topics include major reaction types, reaction stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, atomic and molecular structure and properties, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. The main emphasis is on problem solving and the interpretive application of principles. Corequisites: CHEM 107L, 108L. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and at least Level 3 on MATH Placement Exam, or with permission of instructor. CHEM 107 is a prerequisite for CHEM 108. (LAB)

107L, 108L General Chemistry Lab (Fall, Spring)
1 credit, 1 three-hour laboratory weekly.
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 107L and 108L is required for completion of CHEM 107 and 108. Corequisites: CHEM 107, 108

109 Accelerated General Chemistry (Fall)
4 credits, 3 two-hour integrated lab-lectures weekly. 
This course is designed for students who have a strong high school chemistry background, and will consolidate the more challenging aspects of CHEM 107 and 108. It therefore satisfies the 107- 108 prerequisite for enrollment in upper level science courses, and is not open to students who have already completed 107-108. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics. Prerequisites: high school chemistry, three years of high school mathematics and permission of the Department of Chemistry. (LAB)

150 Topics in Chemistry(Fall, January, Spring)
Special topics of interest are presented through lecture/discussion for non-majors. These topics may vary from semester to semester. If the course has a laboratory included, it will fulfill the general College laboratory requirement.

201, 202 Organic Chemistry (Fall, Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
A study of the preparation and properties of the compounds of carbon. Modern theories are used to interpret structures and reactions. Required of all chemistry and all biology majors. Corequisites: 201L, 202L. Prerequisites: CHEM 107 and 108, or 109; 201 is prerequisite for 202. (LAB)

201L, 202L Organic Chemistry Lab (Fall, Spring)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly.
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 201L and 202L is required for completion of CHEM 201 and 202. Corequisites: CHEM 201, 202.

203 Analytical Chemistry (Spring)
5 credits, 3 one-hour lectures and 1 four-hour laboratory weekly. 
Analytical Chemistry is a study of the art and science of determining the presence and concentration of chemical compounds in diverse samples. This course covers the modern practice of analytical chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 203L. Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or CHEM 109. (LAB)

203L Analytical Chemistry Lab (Spring)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly.
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 203L is required for completion of CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 203.

210 Inorganic Chemistry I (Fall)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
This course focuses on the chemistry of the elements, including electronic structure, bonding and molecular structure, ionic solids, coordination compounds, the origins of the elements, and the descriptive chemistry of the elements. Topics also include inorganic synthesis, materials science, industrial chemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 210L. Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or CHEM 109. (LAB)

210L Inorganic Chemistry Lab (Fall)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 210L is required for completion of CHEM 210. Corequisite: CHEM 210.

292 Sophomore Year Research (Fall, January, Spring)
2 credits.
Each student shall work the equivalent of one afternoon per week during the two regular terms on a laboratory research project associated with a member of the chemistry faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department of Chemistry.

303, 304 Physical Chemistry (Spring, Fall)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
Advanced theories, laws and principles of chemistry. The course will include thermodynamics, electrochemistry, molecular structure, kinetics and spectroscopy. Corequisites: CHEM 303L, 304L. Prerequisites: CHEM 108 or 109; MATH 233; PHYS 140, 141 or 201, 202 (or by permission of the instructor). CHEM 303 is a prerequisite to 304. (LAB)

303L, 304L Physical Chemistry Lab (Spring, Fall)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly.
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 303L and 304L is required for completion of CHEM 303 and 304. Corequisites: CHEM 303, 304. 

390 Junior Seminar (Spring)
1 credit, 1 one-hour meeting weekly.
This course is designed to give each student a basis for understanding and beginning the planning process to perform a senior research project. Should be taken before CHEM/BIOC/ENCH 490.

391 Junior Research (January)
5 seven-hour labs weekly, January Term.
A full time research course. Each student shall work full time on a laboratory research project at the junior level, developed in collaboration with a member of the chemistry faculty, or a person approved by the chemistry faculty, at some outside research agency. The project includes laboratory work, reading and oral reports on papers in the primary chemical literature, oral and written reports on the work done. Prerequisite: permission of the Department of Chemistry (LAB)

392 Junior Year Research (Fall,Spring)
2 credits.
Each student shall work the equivalent of one afternoon per week during the two regular terms on a laboratory research project associated with a member of the chemistry faculty. Prerequisite: permission of the Department of Chemistry.

404 Instrumental Methods of Analysis (Fall)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
The theory and use of modern instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Topics include methods based upon absorption of electromagnetic radiation, chromatographic separations and mass spectrometry. Laboratory emphasizes hands-on use of analytical instrumentation. Corequisite:  CHEM 404L. Prerequisites: CHEM 203, 303. (LAB)

404L Instrumental Methods of Analysis Lab (Fall)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly.
Students perform weekly laboratory experiments to explore and apply concepts covered in the lecture component of the course. A passing grade in CHEM 404L is required for completion of CHEM 404. Corequisite: CHEM 404

410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
Modern theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry with emphasis on physical and chemical principles. Prerequisites: CHEM 303, 304.

450 Selected Topics in Advanced Chemistry
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
Topics studied selected according to interest and needs of individual students. Topics could be in any field of chemistry covered by our faculty including analytical, biological, environmental, inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry. Possible topics include polymer synthesis, natural compounds, medicinal products, quantum mechanics, chemical applications of group theory, electrochemistry, radiochemistry, contaminant remediation, hazardous waste treatment, toxicology, and atmospheric chemistry. Subjects examined in depth by discussions, reading, and problems with emphasis on current literature. Prerequisites: Based on topic and in consultation with instructor. Offered on petition of at least three students.

Biochemistry Courses:

405, 406 Biochemistry I, II (Fall, Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
An in-depth study of the organic chemistry of the molecular components of cells including proteins, enzymes (kinetics and mechanisms), coenzymes, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. The metabolism and biosynthesis of these constituents including glycolysis, Krebs cycle, pentose shunt, electron transport, glycogen synthesis, and lipid oxidation and synthesis will be studied. The energy transformation involved in and the regulation of these pathways will also be discussed. Special topics to be included are hormone biochemistry, biochemical genetics (replication, transcription and translation of genetic material), recombinant DNA, photosynthesis and membrane chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 202 and BIOL 203 or the equivalent. BIOC 405 is prerequisite for BIOC 406.

405L, 406L Biochemistry Lab I, II (Fall, Spring)
2 credits, 1 four-hour lab weekly.
Laboratory experiments in isolation and purification of enzymes/proteins, enzyme kinetics, and the identification and properties of nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Techniques include spectrophotometry, centrifugation, dialysis, PCR, various forms of chromatography and electrophoresis. Corequisites: BIOC 405, 406.

Environmental Chemistry courses:

315 Environmental Chemistry (Spring)
3 credits, 3 one-hour lectures weekly.
This course examines the transport, reactions and effects of chemical species in aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric environments. Topics will include some or all of the following: acid precipitation, water pollution and treatment, hazardous waste treatment, soil chemistry, pesticide behavior, ozone depletion and smog formation. The laboratory introduces basic procedures in environmental monitoring (air, water and soil sample collection and analysis). Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or 109. (LAB)

315L Environmental Chemistry Lab (Spring)
2 credits, 1 four-hour laboratory weekly.
The laboratory introduces basic procedures in environmental monitoring (air, water, and soil sample collection and analysis). The laboratory must be taken concurrently with 315 Environmental Chemistry.

Senior Thesis Research courses:

490 Senior Thesis Research Fall (1 credit) The first part of a year-long research project. The student must develop an original research idea into an oral and written research proposal to be approved by the chemistry department and must begin working on the research project.

490 Senior Thesis Research January (4 credits) A full-time research course. Each student shall work full time on a senior-level laboratory research project developed in collaboration with a member of the chemistry faculty.

490 Senior Thesis Research Spring (1 credit) The third part of a year-long research project. The student must complete the experimental portion of the project, interpret data collected, and report the findings of the research orally in an open forum and as a written thesis.