• A Hartwick student using a microscope for research.
  • A Hartwick professor discussing Botany with a student.
  • A Hartwick student using a microscope in the science lab.
  • A Hartwick professor helping a student during class.

Primary Lab Investigator

KinHo Chan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology

Academic Background:
Purdue University, W Lafayette, IN
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Neuroscience, 2001

Houghton College, Houghton, NY
Bachelor of Arts, 1995
Major in Psychology with minors in Mathematics and Computer Science
Summa Cum Laude

Research Interests:
My area of research interest is the neural basis of cognitive abilities, such as learning and memory. My current research aims to take advantage of the sophisticated conceptual framework of animal learning and the various modern neuroscience techniques to investigate the biological and psychological mechanisms of learning and memory.

Research Experience:

  • Post-doctoral research associate at Rutgers University under the supervision of M. A. Gluck, Ph.D. and C. Myers, Ph.D. "Assessment of the predictive power of the Gluck-Myers Neural Network Computational Model on the role of medial temporal lobe structures in learning and memory." (2001-2002)
  • Graduate research assistant at Purdue University under the supervision of T. L. Davidson, Ph.D. "Reconsideration of the role of the hippocampus in learning inhibition." (1998-2001)
  • Graduate research assistant at Purdue University under the supervision of C. Sahley, Ph.D. "Neuro-electrophysiological bases of associative learning in leeches, hirudo medicinalis."  (1996-1998)
  • Undergraduate research assistant at Houghton College under the supervision of C. Symons, Ph.D. "The self-reference effect in memory encoding." (1995-1996)

Selected Publications and Presentations:

  • Benoit, S. C., Davidson, T. L., Chan, K-H., Jarrard, L. E., & Trigilio, T. (1999). Pavlovian conditioning and extinction of context cues and punctate CSs in rats with ibotenate lesions of the hippocampus. Psychobiology, 27, 26-39.
  • Chan, K-H., Morell, J. R., Jarrard, L. E., & Davidson, T. L. (2001). Reconsideration of the role of the hippocampus in learned inhibition. Behavioural Brain Research, 111-130.
  • Chan, K-H., Jarrard, L. E., & Davidson, T. L. (2003). The effects of selective ibotenate lesions of the hippocampus on conditioned inhibition and extinction. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 3, 111-119.
  • Morell, J. R., Chan, K-H., Davidson, T. L., & Jarrard, L. E. (1998). Selective hippocampal lesions enhance appetitive Pavlovian second-order conditioned responding. Society for Neuroscience Abstract.
  • Morell, J. R., Chan, K-H., Davidson, T. L., & Jarrard, L. E. (1999). Rats with selective hippocampal lesion show impaired inhibitory learning to contextual stimuli: evidence for impaired simple classical conditioning. Society for Neuroscience Abstract.
  • Morell, J. R., Chan, K-H., Davidson, T. L., & Jarrard, L. E. (2000). The effect of ibotenate lesions of the hippocampus on serial feature negative and conditioned inhibition discriminations. Society for Neuroscience Abstract.
  • Chan, K-H., Jarrard, L.E., & Davidson, T. L. (2001). Effects of selective hippocampal lesions and target pretraining on serial feature negative discrimination. Society for Neuroscience Abstract.
  • Chan, K-H., Patel, M., & Gluck, M. A. (2002). The effects of selective ibotenate hippocampal lesion and entorhinal cortex lesion on a compound preconditioning ([AB+], [A+, B-]) task. Society for Neuroscience Abstract.