• Lucrectia Mott: Anna Davis Hollowell, James and Lucretia Mott: Life and Letters, 1884
  • Hartwick student members of the Harriet Tubman Mentor Project
  • Frederick Douglass
  • Julia Ward Howe: Reminiscences 1819-1899

Civil War and the Journey from Slavery to Freedom

As part of the Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration 2012-2013, Hartwick will present The Journey from Slavery to Freedom: Intersecting Voices for Racial and Gender Equity from the Pages of 19th Century Classics.

Note: All images are provided courtesy of the privately-owned Matthews Collection for the Preservation of Freedom Journey Classics.

Anti-slavery advocates, men and women, black and white, believed that one human being should not have the right to own another person. Controversy, however, focused on whether the races were equal in nature, as well as the varying views about the status of women as full citizens.

Hartwick College's Civil War Sesquicentennial Commemoration 2012-13 is an experiential certificate program offered by the U.S. Pluralism Center that will explore a series of writings, short films, and powerpoint presentations regarding leaders of the Journey from Slavery to Freedom who addressed issues of abolition, citizenship, voting rights of enslaved Americans, and the struggle of women for voting rights. In celebration of African American History Month, the Centennial of Harriet Tubman's Date of Death, and Women's History Month, the following exhibit and events are scheduled for February through June 2013.

February
Black History Month Celebration - Tuesday, February 12, 5-7 p.m., Chesebro, Dewar Student Union
PALS sponsors a dinner presentation with poet David Mills and his portrayals of Langston Hughes and related black poets. Free for 30 participants, but advanced reservation of seats is required. E-mail Matthewsh@hartwick.edu.

Frederick Douglass and Select Players of the Freedom Journey: An Exhibit of Frederick Douglass Images and Related Items - Thursday, February 14, 1-4 p.m., U.S. Pluralism Center, Bresee 101
This reception is for the commencement of the exhibit on Frederick Douglass' birthday. (See sources below).

March
Emancipation Weekend - Harriet Tubman Civil War Dinner Discussion, Sunday, March 10, 2013, 5-7 p.m., Chesebro, Dewar Student Union
PALS, in cooperation with SOSU/BU and the Harriet Tubman Mentoring Project present a tribute to Harriet Tubman, the local Underground Railroad, and report the final recommendations for the upcoming Harriet Tubman - Buffalo Soldiers Student Conference scheduled for November 1-3, 2013. Advanced registration is required. To reserve a seat, please e-mail Matthewsh@hartwick.edu.

Women's History Month Awards Reception - Multi-Ethnic Civil Rights Pioneers, Thursday, March 14, 2013, Awards Reception with President Margaret L. Drugovich , 4-5 p.m.; Dinner Discussion, 5-7 p.m., Farrington, Dewar Student Union
Advanced reservation is required for the Dinner Discussion. To reserve a seat, please e-mail Matthewsh@hartwick.edu.

Experiential Journey - Visiting the Women's Hall of Fame and the Harriet Tubman Home, Saturday, March 16, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Members of the Harriet Tubman Mentoring Project will be joined by other members of the Hartwick College community for this educational experience. Advanced registration is required. To reserve a seat, please e-mail Matthewsh@hartwick.edu.

April
Experiential Journey - Underground Railroad Conference of New York, April 13, 2013, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Members of the Harriet Tubman Mentoring Project will be joined by other members of the Hartwick College community at this annual event. To reserve a seat, please e-mail Matthewsh@hartwick.edu.

PALS Award Dinner and Reception/Emancipation Weekend - Thursday - Saturday, April 25-27, 2013, Thursday, 5-7 p.m., Chesebro; Friday, U.S. Pluralism Center Open House, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.; Saturday, movie night (TBA). Events will commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation and the role that was played by personalities of Otsego County and the Hartwick Seminary and Academy.

June
Experiential Journey - 21st Annual Peterboro Civil War Weekend, June 8, 2013, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Harry Bradshaw Matthews will present images and stories of the African American Freedom Journey and the Civil War.

Frederick Douglass and Select Players of the Freedom Journey: An Exhibit of Frederick Douglass Images and Related Items
At a time when African Americans began telling their own story in earnest, James T. Haley authored in 1897 Sparkling Gems of Race Knowledge Worth Reading. In the text he identified the statesman Frederick Douglass, Toussaint L'Overture of the Haitian Revolution, and Richard Allen of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, as the three most important leaders of the race who were most written about during their lifetimes and after. A photograph of Douglass seated in a grand chair appeared in the book, but not images of the other two heroes. According to the World Catalogue System (WorldCat) less than a handful of libraries worldwide have copies of the first edition of this book.

In appreciation of the historic notation, the United States Colored Troops Institute at Hartwick College, which is designated by the National Park Service as a (research) facility of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, is hosting an exhibit, Frederick Douglass and Select Players of the Freedom Journey, providing pictorials of some of the leading personalities of the Underground Railroad and the Civil War.

The images are provided courtesy of the Matthews Collection for the Preservation of Freedom Journey Classics, a privately owned collection that provides support for the work of the USCTI and its student chapter, the Harriet Tubman Mentoring Project. The images, as well as others, will be on display at the U.S. Pluralism Center, 101 Bresee Hall at Hartwick College, beginning February 14, 2013 to honor Frederick Douglass' birthday.

Some of the important images and their respective book sources are:

The Life of Toussaint L'Ouverture, by John R. Beard, was published in London in 1853. It included several engravings of L'Ouverture. The WorldCat identifies nine libraries with first edition copies of the publication.

History of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, by Daniel A. Payne, was published in 1891 in Nashville, TN. An engraving of Richard Allen with his signature was included as done by John Sartain of Philadelphia. Engravings of others included Rev. Daniel Coker, Rev. Morris Brown, and the Rev. William Paul Quinn. The WorldCat identifies 64 libraries with first edition copies of the publication.

Eight images of Frederick Douglass are shared from rare publications, including two from books that he authored. In several cases, an illustration image is repeated in other publications.

Autographs for Freedom, edited by Julia Griffiths in 1854, was published in Auburn and Rochester, New York in behalf of the Rochester Ladies Anti-Slavery Society. It contains 50 essays by some of the leading abolitionists, black and white, including an autographed engraving of Frederick Douglass (facing to the right) and five other darker brethren, including William Wells Brown and Charles L. Reason. The three engravings were done by J.C Buttre. The WorldCat identifies 22 libraries with first edition copies of the publication.

My Bondage and My Freedom was authored by Douglass in 1855. Included was a new engraving of him that was done by J.C Buttre, in which the statesman was facing to the left. The WorldCat identifies 32 libraries with first edition copies of the book.

Life and Times of Frederick Douglass was an autobiography published in 1882. The engraving of Douglass was done by Augustus Robin of New York that revealed an aging statesman. An autograph accompanied the image. The WorldCat identifies more than 150 libraries with first edition copies published in Connecticut and London.

History of the Colored Race in America, by William T. Alexander, was published in 1887 in Kansas City, MO. An illustration of Frederick Douglass was included in the text along with his signature. The WordCat identifies 22 libraries with first editions of the book.

A School History of the Negro Race in America, by Edward A. Johnson was copyrighted in 1891 and published in 1891 and 1892. It included an illustration of Douglass (without his signature), but very similar to the illustration in Alexander's book. The WorldCat identifies 55 libraries with first editions of the book published in 1891 and four additional copies of those that were printed in 1892.

The Afro-American Press and Its Editors, by I. Garland Penn, was published in Massachusetts in 1891. The illustration of Douglass as an elder statesman was the same as in Johnson's book and became a reoccurring image in other publications. Numerous personalities are presented with illustrations. The WorldCat identifies 140 libraries with first editions of the book.

Afro-American Encyclopedia: or, The Thoughts, Doings, and Sayings of the Race, by James T. Haley was published in 1895 in Nashville, TN. The 638-page text included the same photograph image as it appeared in the author's earlier book. The WorldCat identifies 40 libraries with first editions of the book.

A Memorial to Frederick Douglass from the City of Boston, by the Common Council of the City of Boston, was published in Boston in 1896. A photograph of Douglass with his signature appeared in the book. The WorldCat identifies 23 libraries with first editions of the book.

An Authentic History of the Douglass Monument: Biographical Facts and Incidents in the Life of Frederick Douglass, by J.W. Thompson, was published in Rochester in 1903. A photograph of Douglass was included in the book. The WorldCat identifies 49 libraries with first editions of the book.

The Negro in American History, by John W. Cromwell, was published in 1914. It includes a photograph image of Douglass as one of four important personalities grouped together; the other three were Booker T. Washington, Daniel A. Payne, and Paul Laurence Dunbar. The book also included a picture of the Douglass Statue in Rochester, NY. The WorldCat identities 197 libraries with first editions of the book.

Frederick Douglass Monument Dedication Service Program was distributed at the unveiling on June 9, 1899. The two-sided program includes a photograph of Douglass. The reverse side is an illustration of the Douglass Monument.