NEWS

"The Scorpion's Sting: The Irreconcilable Conflict Over Slavery"

Hartwick NEH Lecture Series Concludes with Oakes

April 4, 2014

Later today, Hartwick College will conclude its year-long lecture series on emancipation titled "Henceforth and Forever Free: Reflections on the Sesquicentennial of Emancipation in the United States" with a lecture by Dr. James Oakes, Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He will present his lecture, "The Scorpion's Sting: The Irreconcilable Conflict Over Slavery."

The event will take place this evening at 7 p.m. in the Shineman Chapel House Celebration Room on the Hartwick College campus. The event is free and open to the public, and hors d'oeuvres will be served.

For more than three decades, Oakes has been one of the leading historians on slavery, the South, and the Civil War. He authored numerous influential books and scholarly articles, some of which include The Rule of Race: A History of American Slaveholders (1982), Slavery and Freedom: An Interpretation of the Old South (1990), and the Lincoln Prize-winning The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics (2007).  His most recent book, Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-65 (2012), also won the Lincoln Prize and was nominated for the National Book Award.

Funding for this series comes courtesy of Hartwick College and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

The NEH is an independent federal agency which was created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States. Democracy demands wisdom, and so the NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the humanities and conveying the lessons of history to all Americans. The Endowment accomplishes this mission by awarding grants for top-rated proposals examined by panels of independent, external reviewers.

For further information regarding Oakes' publications, visit www.gc.cuny.edu. For more information about the series, contact Associate Professor of History at Hartwick College Dr. Sean Kelley at 607-431-4584 or kelleys@hartwick.edu

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Hartwick College is a private liberal arts and sciences college of 1,500 students, located in Oneonta, NY, in the northern foothills of the Catskill Mountains. Hartwick's expansive curriculum emphasizes an experiential approach to the liberal arts. Through personalized teaching, collaborative research, a distinctive January Term, a wide range of internships, and vast study-abroad opportunities, Hartwick ensures that students are prepared for not just their first jobs, but for the world ahead. A Three-Year Bachelor's Degree Program and strong financial aid and scholarship offerings keep a Hartwick education affordable.

Contact: Valerie Capullo
E-mail: capullov@hartwick.edu 
Phone: 607-431-4031