Course Descriptions

Summer Sessions 2020
Course Offerings

Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3

Registration Payment
Session 1 – June 1 to June 26, 2020
 

ART 250: Smartphone Photography and Video
BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
BUSA 150: Fashion Branding
BUSA 350: Sports Marketing
GLST 160: Introduction to Global Studies
MUSI 106: Learning About Music

PE 134: Healthy Ways to Manage Stress
PHIL 250:  Moral Psychology: Ethics & The Brain
PHYS 125: Energy, Climate & Society
SCIE 301: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology I
SOCI 371: Social Policy & Social Welfare

ART 250: Smartphone Photography and Video
4 credits, Arts & Humanities, EL

This course explores the creative possibilities of smartphone cameras through still and moving images. We will learn the basics of digital photography including composition, lighting, camera angles and point of view. For the creation of video we will discuss how images work through time and the use of storyboards. The class will research app ‘filters’ and consider how they change an image’s meaning. Through the use of Apps, the class will learn basic photo and video editing. We will also cover the use of external accessories for smart phones that can enhance the types of images your phone can capture. Class assignments and projects will be uploaded and reviewed utilizing popular photo-based social media apps. This introductory art course is for non-majors.

This course is taught by Dr. Joe Von Stengel, Art Department.

BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 credits, Physical & Life Sciences (lab)

How is the human body structured, from the smallest components to the whole body? What happens when the components of the body, such as molecules and cells, don’t develop properly, or are not produced in the right number? How might those circumstances be associated with disease? If the structure of the human body, and what happens when the structure is abnormal intrigues you, this course may be for you. This is an introductory course designed for nursing majors that emphasizes the important concepts, terminology, and interrelationships of human structure and function. Following an introduction to some general features of anatomy and physiology, BIOL 206 proceeds with hierarchical study of atoms and molecules, cells and tissues, and organs and organ systems with emphasis on the integument, skeleto-muscular and nervous systems (including special senses). This course does not fulfill any requirement in the biology major. 

This course is taught by Dr. A.J. Russo, Department of Biology.

BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
3 credits, Physical & Life Sciences
Prerequisites: NURS 134, NURS 234, BIOL 206 & 207, CHEM 105

This course is designed to examine specific diseases from a physiologic and developmental perspective. Mechanisms of disease, etiology, manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions are reviewed. This content will serve as a foundation for addressing therapeutic interventions related to specific disease states. Student-centered learning aids about the most essential and challenging concepts in pathophysiology are embedded in the online modules to enhance learning and mastery of the content; graphics to clarify the content; animations to define pathophysiologic processes in a dynamic way; pre-tests and interactive self-assessment exercises for content review; audio glossary, and discussion forums to encourage interaction between classmates. Case studies are used extensively to provide application of content to a clinical situation. This course will integrate your knowledge and skills into a creative and engaging community of online learners. Moreover, multimedia instructional technology will be used to foster and enhance faculty-student engagement.

This course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.

BUSA 150: Fashion Branding
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Over the course of the past decades, firms have come to realize the financial value of brands. However, the creation and capture of value through branding is no easy task, as brands must be carefully created. In this course, we will look at what a fashion brand is and why companies position themselves in the marketplace with certain products. We will also discuss how the fashion industry creates powerful and persuasive messages to sell a given image to consumers and how consumers co-opt these messages by purchasing fashion’s images. Other topics will focus on brand landscape, brand equity and pricing strategies.

This course is taught by Dr. Wei Wei Zhang, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

BUSA 350: Sports Marketing
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences
Prerequisites: BUSA 240

This course explores the complex and diverse nature of sports marketing. It applies fundamental marketing concepts to the sports industry, including the marketing mix, consumer behavior, marketing research, segmentation analysis, and assessment of marketing programs specific to sports. Guidelines for the formulation of marketing goals and strategies will be included. Trends, issues, and problems influencing the industry will also be examined.

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

GLST 160: Introduction to Global Studies
3 credits, Art & Humanities, Foreign Language

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary perspectives on global systems using concepts such as diversity, tradition, hybrid or blended identities, and tolerance. It seeks to help students find ways to work respectfully and productively in an interconnected world. In some cases, this course contributes to fulfillment of the language requirement.

This course is taught by Dr. Mark Wolff, Chair, Department of Modern Languages.

MUSI 106: Learning About Music
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

You listen to music every day, but are you hearing it? Do you really know why you like some styles and not others? Did you know that there are many types of music, from America, Europe and around the world, some going back centuries, which you would probably enjoy listening to were you to discover them? This course will make you a more avid, more intent, and more informed listener. This course will introduce you to new forms and styles of music, and it will help you make better sense of the music you hear. You will learn how and why our culture and other cultures make music and how different types of music are organized. Appreciation of any art form comes from a combination of interest and understanding, and developing your interest in music into appreciation through greater understanding is what this course is all about.

This course is taught by Ben Aldridge, Department of Music.

PE 134: Healthy Ways to Manage Stress
3 credits, fulfills one of two PHED requirements

This course will offer a comprehensive and holistic approach to manage stress. Students will learn to identify the clear connection between stress and quality of life. This course will provide coping strategies, life skills, and relaxation techniques while discussing the nature of stress, psychology of stress, communication, eco-therapy, time and money management, nutrition and physical activity.

This course is taught by Valerie Bolger.

PHIL 250: Moral Psychology: Ethics & The Brain
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Moral psychology explores the relationship between ethics and the way human brains process information. In this course our goal will be to analyze research in philosophy and psychology on moral reasoning, judgments, and decision-making. We will explore the nature of belief and its relationship to practical and theoretical moral reasoning. We will also delve into the nature of character traits and ask if empirical psychology gives us reason to doubt that we have any such traits. We will try to examine what it means for us to trust someone and whether or not such a state is ever warranted or even possible. We will explore how our emotions influence our reasoning processes and ask if it is possible that our emotions are indispensable for ethics. And we will explore questions about moral responsibility and try to understand if we can be responsible for our behavior when it is controlled by psychological processes that are beyond our control.

This course is taught by Dr. Stefanie Rocknak, Chair, Department of Philosophy.

PHYS 125: Energy, Climate & Society
3 credits, Physical & Life Sciences

This course provides an investigation into the energy sources that make our modern world possible and the impact of those energy sources on the environment. Fossil fuels, nuclear energy, solar power, hydropower, wind power, and alternative energy sources will be investigated. The class will consider some major issues: What to do when we reach peak oil? What should we do in response to global warming? What changes are the students likely to see during their lifetimes?

This course is taught by Dr. Kevin Schultz, Department of Physics.

SCIE 301: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology I
3 credits; Hartwick College Nursing Students Only
Pre-requisites: For nursing majors: BIOL 206, BIOL 207, CHEM 105 OR CHEM 107/107L OR CHEM 108/108L OR CHEM 109, SCIE 144, AND NURS 134

This course focuses on disease processes and pharmacological treatments from a physiologic and developmental perspective. The pathophysiologic content addresses mechanisms of disease, etiology, clinical manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions. The pharmacological interventions are grounded in the physiology and pathophysiology of disorders, including the mechanism of action, use, administration, adverse effects, contraindications, interactions, and specific care considerations.

This course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.

SOCI 371: Social Policy & Social Welfare
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences
Pre-requisite: SOCI 115 or SOCI 321

This course provides an overview of Social Welfare Policy in the United States, introduces students to the history and development of social welfare policy and services, and explores current social welfare issues and challenges that citizens face across the nation. While social welfare policy fundamentally affects the lives of all people in a society, understanding social welfare policy and knowing current social welfare systems and how they impact clients and communities are essential. The goal of this course thus is to help students understand why and how social welfare policy is developed and implemented in the United States, the roles of social workers in all areas of practice in promoting social justice, how social welfare policy operates, and what the resources and opportunities that shape service delivery systems are available for recipients of social welfare programs as well as service-providers.

This course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.

Session 2 – June 29 to July 24, 2020
 

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
BIOL 344: Pathopysiology
BUSA 150: How We Shop: Consumption and Consumer Society
BUSA 150: Life Portfolio: Market Yourself
BUSA 250: Esports: Follow the Money
BUSA 250: Market Yourself/Build a Career
CRMJ 310: Criminology
ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics
ENSS 160: Introduction to Environmental Studies
INTR 250: Law, Ethics, and the Visual Arts
MATH 150: Math for Nurses

MUSI 170: Country Music
PE 157: Hiking for Wellness
PE 351: Fitness for Wellbeing
PHIL 150: Healthcare Ethics
SCIE 302: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology II
SOCI 111: Controversial Social Issues

Registration Payment

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 credits, Physical & Life Sciences (lab)
Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 206)

How are the various organ systems—such as the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems—in the human body put together? How do the systems work together to make sure the whole body functions the way it should? What happens when a body system or a group of body systems fails to work properly, such as failures that might result in a stroke or heart attack? If these questions intrigue you, this course may be of interest to you. This is an introductory course designed for nursing majors that emphasizes the important concepts, terminology, and interrelationships of human structure and function. The course emphasizes the study of body systems including endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. This course does not fulfill any requirement in the biology major.

This course is taught Dr. A. J. Russo, Department of Biology.

BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
3 credits, Physical & Life Sciences
Prerequisites: NURS 134, NURS 234, BIOL 206 & 207, CHEM 105

This course is designed to examine specific diseases from a physiologic and developmental perspective. Mechanisms of disease, etiology, manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions are reviewed. This content will serve as a foundation for addressing therapeutic interventions related to specific disease states. Student-centered learning aids about the most essential and challenging concepts in pathophysiology are embedded in the online modules to enhance learning and mastery of the content; graphics to clarify the content; animations to define pathophysiologic processes in a dynamic way; pre-tests and interactive self-assessment exercises for content review; audio glossary, and discussion forums to encourage interaction between classmates. Case studies are used extensively to provide application of content to a clinical situation. This course will integrate your knowledge and skills into a creative and engaging community of online learners. Moreover, multimedia instructional technology will be used to foster and enhance faculty-student engagement.

This course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.

BUSA 150: How We Shop: Consumption and Consumer Society
3 credits; Social & Behavioral Science

In a consumer society, shopping, buying, having, showing and wearing became central aspects of who we are, who we dream of being, how we interact with each other, and how we affect the larger environment. In this course, we take an interdisciplinary approach to studying consumerism, drawing upon academic research from various theoretical and applied perspectives. We will examine how consumerism influences individual behaviors, social welfare, culture, environmental quality, economic performance, and public policy. We will study both the positive and negative impacts of consumerism on individuals and societies. We will also explore our personal choices as members of a consumer society, considering how we can lead balanced and fulfilling lives.

This course is taught by Dr. Weiwei Zhang, Department of Business and Accounting

BUSA 150: Life Portfolio: Market Yourself
3 credits
Designed especially for Hartwick College ’20 graduates and all Hartwick alumni

Students will learn how to market themselves in a digital world. Students will learn how to tell their stories through print, voice, and video, and create compelling Career Portfolios that present skills, talents, and abilities to employers. Students will also learn how to conduct a deep comprehensive job search that matches their skills with their career/life goals. Students will discover how companies like Indeed.com and CareerBuilder.com use data mining in their selection process and the tools of the trade for recruiters. Students will create their own career portfolios that include a business card, head shot, resume, Glassdoor, and LinkedIn accounts, 3-5min recruitment video, and a 3-minute “pitch.”

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

BUSA 250: Esports: Follow the Money
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Esports is a massive and rapidly growing industry.  It is a form of competition, facilitated through gaming.  Most commonly, Esports take the form of organized, multiplayer online video game competitions.  Esports now rivals traditional American sports, especially in viewership and has its own governing body, the North America Scholastic Esports Federation.  This course will explore the impact that Esports has had on college athletics, college and high school curriculums, and the recruiting or exploitation of Esports athletes.  We will follow the money and explore both the positive and negative impacts of this newest phenomenon. 

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

CRMJ 310: Criminology
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences, ILS
Prerequisite: SOCI 105 and CRMJ 110

This course examines criminal behavior and the measures intended to control it. Major emphasis is placed upon social factors that contribute to such behavior, and criminal justice system efforts to combat criminal behavior. Attention is also given to current trends in criminal behavior and criminal justice policy, and the evaluation of these from the perspective of different sociological theories.

This course is taught by Amber Kerwin, Department of Sociology.

ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Rapid change affects the growth of the economy, and means it is imperative to learn how markets positively and negatively affect our well-being. To accomplish this goal, Principles of Macroeconomics will develop your understanding of the models and concepts used to analyze the economy as a whole. You will learn the language of economics, which will give you a lifelong ability for economic thinking. The relevance of economics to contemporary issues that have considerable consequences in the United States is stressed throughout the course.

This course is taught by Dr. Laurence Malone, Department of Economics.

ENSS 160: Introduction to Environmental Studies
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This course investigates major contributions of the social and natural sciences to our understanding of how and why environmental problems happen. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life, but a product of social conditions that can be studied, understood, and changed. In this course, we examine approaches to resolving environmental problems, including strategies such as market-based policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote environmental justice and sustainable development. Students apply these conceptual approaches to root causes, consequences, and solutions to specific environmental topics.

This course is taught by Dr. Amy Forster-Rothbart, Department of Political Science.

INTR 250: Law, Ethics, and the Visual Arts
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

We are captivated by stories of stolen art, forgeries, war plunder, and art auctions bringing astronomical sums of money. This course will examine our cultural fascination with these things as well as domestic and international law governing the art world. Using primary and secondary sources, like case studies, documentaries, and popular films, this course will address such topics as war plunder and reparations, the international trade in art, artist’s rights, the activities of museums and auction houses, as well as historical and cultural heritage.

This course is taught by Sean Shannon, Ph.D., J.D.

MATH 150: Math for Nurses
2 credits

This course provides the mathematical background necessary for success as a Nursing major. Topics covered will include Algebra and Dimensional Analysis. The course should be taken only by students who intend to major in Nursing. This course cannot be used to satisfy QFR requirement and does not count toward a mathematics major or minor.

This course taught by Dr. Min Chung, Chair, Department of Mathematics.

MUSI 170: Country Music
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

This course provides a survey of the history, structure, and fundamental ingredients of the American musical genre known as “country.” Throughout this course we will explore the roots of Country Music and how they relate to the hills of Appalachia; uncover the inspiration of Gospel Music and its relationship to country music sounds; discover the foundational influence of Blues Music; compare “new country” to “old country”; analyze the role of women in country music; and consider how these factors and more have shaped current country music offerings. We will explore social topics including domestic violence, suicide, war, gender conformity, and marketing, and review the ways these concepts are expressed in this genre. We will reflect upon the role of the Grand Ole Opry, from its inception to the present day. Finally, this course will emphasize the contributions of diverse ethnic cultures and societies in formation of the music, structure, and emotional dimensions of this genre.

This course is taught by Dr. Meghan Sheehy, Department of Music.

PE 157: Hiking for Wellness
3 credits, fulfills one of two PHED requirements

This course involves fundamental instruction in wilderness hiking skills and technique. Primary focus is in preparation for independent day hikes and includes physical conditioning, selection of equipment, navigation, Leave No Trace Principles, first aid and survival topics, and trip planning. Students complete a series of independent hikes that range in difficulty, terrain and length. Students maintain a journal of hikes (7 in total), complete weekly quizzes and submit a final paper. This course requires a Student Health Assessment waiver.

This course is taught by Matt Sanford, Registrar and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs.

PE 351: Fitness for Wellbeing
3 credits, fulfills one of two PHED requirements

Students will participate daily in online workouts with the instructor as well as individualized exercise sessions at the location of their choosing. Through the use of pre- and post-assessments, students will have an opportunity to recognize how the body adapts and changes when a new stimulus is provided and to better understand how individualized training, rather than one size fits all, is beneficial. Students will build their own individualized training design which will connect back to their original goals.

This course is taught by Heidi Tanner, Director of Wellness and Health Promotion.

PHIL 150: Healthcare Ethics
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

The aim of this course is to explore some of the complex ethical and political issues surrounding healthcare in the 21st-century. After a quick introduction to ethical theory, the course is organized into three broad areas of inquiry: 1) issues concerning individuals (euthanasia, cloning technology, genetic engineering); 2) issues concerning medical organizations (ethical issues in emergency medicine, the use of ethics consultation, the place of spiritual beliefs in treatment); and 3) issues concerning healthcare policy and public health (healthcare inequality, the ethics of disaster relief, the ethics of universal health care). Students will also have the opportunity to discuss topics of their own choosing in the final week of the course. Course assignments: participation in discussion boards, weekly exams, and a final paper.

This course is taught by Dr. Jeremy Wisnewski, Department of Philosophy.

SCIE 302: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology II
3 credits; Hartwick College Nurses Only
Prerequisites: For nursing majors: BIOL 206, BIOL 207, CHEM 105 OR CHEM 107/107L OR CHEM 108/108L OR CHEM 109, SCIE 144, AND NURS 134 SCIE 301.

This course focuses on disease processes and pharmacological treatments from a physiologic and developmental perspective. The pathophysiologic content addresses mechanisms of disease, etiology, clinical manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions. The pharmacological interventions are grounded in the physiology and pathophysiology of disorders, including the mechanism of action, use, administration, adverse effects, contraindications, interactions, and specific care considerations. Successful completion of SCIE 301: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology I is required in order to progress to SCIE 302: Pathophysiology & Pharmacology II.

The course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.

SOCI 111: Controversial Social Issues
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the controversial social issues of our time. Throughout the term we will examine several controversial issues, such as terrorism, human trafficking, war, health care, and other major areas of social concern. In doing so, we will read the arguments of leading social scientists and then debate the basic assumptions and values of each position.

The course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.

Session 3 – July 27 to August 21, 2020
 

BIOL 150: Medical and Health Terminology
BUSA 150: Life Portfolio: Market Yourself
BUSA 250: Global Strategic Management
BUSA 250: Market Yourself/Build a Career
CRMJ 110: Introduction to Criminal Justice

MATH 100: Algebra Review
MUSI 170: County Music
POSC 208: Russian Politics
SOCI 105: Introduction to Sociology
THEA 250: Can We Talk? Theatre & Health

Registration Payment

BIOL 150: Medical and Health Terminology
3 credits, Physical & Life Sciences

This course introduces students to the language used by health-care practitioners, with special attention to the needs of nurses. Students will gain a solid foundation in medical language covering body systems, disease, health, wellness, diagnostics and more.

This course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.

BUSA 150: Life Portfolio: Market Yourself
3 credits
Designed especially for Hartwick College ’20 graduates and all Hartwick alumni

Students will learn how to market themselves in a digital world. Students will learn how to tell their stories through print, voice, and video, and create compelling Career Portfolios that present skills, talents, and abilities to employers. Students will also learn how to conduct a deep comprehensive job search that matches their skills with their career/life goals. Students will discover how companies like Indeed.com and CareerBuilder.com use data mining in their selection process and the tools of the trade for recruiters. Students will create their own career portfolios that include a business card, head shot, resume, Glassdoor, and LinkedIn accounts, 3-5min recruitment video, and a 3-minute “pitch.”

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

BUSA 250: Global Strategic Management
4 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Companies are increasingly required to manage strategy on a global scale. This course describes the context of business today, identifies global strategies and shares the best approaches to global management. Students that take this course will have an advanced knowledge of the global business environment, a deeper understanding of strategy and a greater ability to apply that knowledge in the corporate environment. This course is an excellent complement to someone majoring in management, marketing or international business. This course will couple course material (textbook and lectures) with the application in case studies.

This course is taught by Dr. Aaron Stephens, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

BUSA 250: Market Yourself/Build a Career
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Maximize your classroom, college, and life experiences by learning to market yourself. This course has two parts; self-marketing and the job search. Students will learn how to market themselves in a digital world by identifying their skills, talents, abilities. Students will learn how to tell their stories through print, voice and video and create compelling Career Portfolios that present skills, talents and abilities to employers. Students will learn how much they already have to offer: lab reports, Excel spreadsheets, marketing campaigns, public speaking events, creative writing, data analysis, team assignments are all examples of your capabilities and what you offer to an employer. Students will also learn how to conduct a deep comprehensive job search that matches their stories with their career/life goals. Learn how companies like Indeed.com and CareerBuilder.com use data mining in their selection process and the tools of the trade for recruiters. Career portfolios will include a business card, head shot, resume and LinkedIn account, as well as a 3-5min recruitment video and a 3-minute “pitch.” This class will prepare students to create their own pathways to employment.

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.

CRMJ 110: Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This course is designed to introduce students to the American criminal justice system and the role of the police, the courts, and correctional facilities within that system. It focuses on the history and the primary duties of our justice system in America while briefly introducing conceptions of justice as well as definitions of, measurement of, and causes of crime. Within the detailed discussions of the police, the courts, and corrections particular attention is paid to current debates within each of these criminal justice agencies.

This course is taught by Dr. Ryan Ceresola, Department of Sociology.

MATH 100: Algebra Review
2 credits

This course provides the background necessary for Math 120 Precalculus. Topics covered include properties of real numbers, exponents, and radicals; operations involving polynomials and other algebraic expressions; solving equations and inequalities. Other topics may be included if time permits. The course should be taken only by students who intend to take Math 120 Precalculus. This course cannot be used to satisfy QFR requirement and does not count toward a mathematics major or minor.

This course taught by Dr. Min Chung, Department of Mathematics.

MUSI 170: Country Music
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

This course provides a survey of the history, structure, and fundamental ingredients of the American musical genre known as “country.” Throughout this course we will explore the roots of Country Music and how they relate to the hills of Appalachia; uncover the inspiration of Gospel Music and its relationship to country music sounds; discover the foundational influence of Blues Music; compare “new country” to “old country”; analyze the role of women in country music; and consider how these factors and more have shaped current country music offerings. We will explore social topics including domestic violence, suicide, war, gender conformity, and marketing, and review the ways these concepts are expressed in this genre. We will reflect upon the role of the Grand Ole Opry, from its inception to the present day. Finally, this course will emphasize the contributions of diverse ethnic cultures and societies in formation of the music, structure, and emotional dimensions of this genre.

This course is taught by Dr. Meghan Sheehy, Department of Music.

POSC 208: Russian Politics
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

An evaluation of the history, politics, and economics of Russia and its “near abroad” (the countries of the former Soviet Union). The course will examine the post-Communist transitions that have been taking place in the political, economic and social realms and the different form they have taken in different states. Particular attention will be given to questions of democratization and authoritarian consolidation, integration into regional and international organizations, and changes in the political economy.

This course is taught by Dr. Amy Forster-Rothbart, Department of Political Science.

SOCI 105: Introduction to Sociology
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

What is Sociology? How do sociologists go about their work? Sociology offers a distinctive perspective on human behavior. The links between personal experience and wider social forces are explored while covering the main fields of the discipline.

The course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.

THEA 250: Can We Talk? Theatre & Health
3 credits, EL, Public Health and Nursing

An Applied Theatre course, “Can We Talk?” teaches students how methods used to create theatre can be used within both educational and therapeutic contexts. In this course, students will use elements of theatrical play to develop community building, leadership, research, communication, and presentation skills by working with diverse groups to devise personal and community well-being projects. Internship and Scholarship opportunities are available upon successful completion. This course may serve as an EL elective for Public Health and Nursing majors.

This course is taught by Malissa Kano-White, Chair, Department of Theatre and Heider Tanner, Director of Wellness & Health Promotion

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