Course Descriptions

har-summer-online-iconSummer Sessions 2018
Course Offerings

Session 1 | Session 2 | Session 3

Registration Payment
Session 1 – June 4 to June 29, 2018
 

BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
BUSA 101: Introduction to Business
INTR 170: Internships & Career Planning
INTR 370: Design Your Life: Career Invention and
Re-invention Through Design Thinking

MUSI 106: Learning About Music
POSC 101: U.S. Government and Politics
POSC 340: Media and Politics
SOCI 105: Introduction to Sociology

BIOL 206: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 credits, Physical and Life Sciences (lab)

How is the human body structured, from the smallest components to the whole body? What happens when the components of the body, such as molecules and cells, don’t develop properly, or are not produced in the right number? How might those circumstances be associated with disease? If the structure of the human body, and what happens when the structure is abnormal, intrigues you, this course may be for you.

This course is taught by Dr. A.J. Russo, Department of Biology.


BIOL 344: Pathophysiology
3 credits, Physical and Life Sciences
Prerequisites: NURS 134, NURS 234, BIOL 206 & 207, CHEM 105

This course is designed to examine specific diseases from a physiologic and developmental perspective. Mechanisms of disease, etiology, manifestations, analyses of laboratory data, and primary medical and surgical interventions are reviewed. This content will serve as a foundation for addressing therapeutic interventions related to specific disease states.

Student-centered learning aids about the most essential and challenging concepts in pathophysiology are embedded in the online modules to enhance learning and mastery of the content; graphics to clarify the content, animations to define pathophysiologic processes in a dynamic way, pre-tests and interactive self-assessment exercises for content review, audio glossary, and discussion forums to encourage interaction between classmates. Case studies are used extensively to provide application of content to a clinical situation. This course will integrate your knowledge and skills into a creative and engaging community of online learners. Moreover, multimedia instructional technology will be used to foster and enhance faculty-student engagement.

This course is taught by M. Syed, Department of Biology.


BUSA 101: Introduction to Business
4 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences, EL

Introduction to the various functional areas of business, including marketing, finance, operations, management, and strategy. Specific topics covered include basic financial analysis, forms of business ownership, managerial decision making, and business ethics in a local, national, and international context. Includes a significant experiential learning component. No prerequisite.

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.


INTR 170: Interships & Career Planning
3 credits

This course provides students the opportunity to gather information about careers based on their interests in the academic and occupational settings, encouraging informed career decision-making. Students will engage in self-reflection, values exploration, research on careers, and internship research. The goal of this course is to prepare students to identify and apply to internships, fellowships, research and fieldwork, shadowing experiences, or other experiential opportunities.

This course is taught by Brittany Beach, Internship and Career Planning Advisor


INTR 370: Design Your Life: Career Invention and Re-invention Through Design Thinking
3 credits

Are you a student, seeking ways to connect your major and your professional interests and don’t know where to start? Or, are you a mid-career professional, looking to transition to a new job or discover new meaning in your life and work? This course will provide you with innovative tools and techniques to design a career, and life, that brings you meaning and fulfillment. Activities will include developing or updating your employment package, redesigning or developing an authentic brand online, in person and on paper, and building a design thinking team. The course will also provide a platform for developing resilience and creativity, as well as life-long strategies to overcome career and life bumps and barriers.

This course is taught by Melissa Marietta, Director of Career Services


MUSI 106: Learning About Music
3 credits, Humanities

You listen to music every day, but are you hearing it? Do you really know why you like some styles and not others? Did you know that there are many types of music, from America, Europe and around the world, some going back centuries, which you would probably enjoy listening to were you to discover them? This course will make you a more avid, more intent, and more informed listener. This course will introduce you to new forms and styles of music, and it will help you make better sense of the music you hear. You will learn how and why our culture and other cultures make music and how different types of music are organized. Appreciation of any art form comes from a combination of interest and understanding, and developing your interest in music into appreciation through greater understanding is what this course is all about.

This course is taught by Ben Aldridge, Department of Music.


POSC 101: U.S. Government and Politics
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course is an examination of the constitutional foundations, structures and processes of U.S. government and politics with a heavy focus on current events relating to voting, public opinion, the legislative process, and the presidency.  Not only does the course fulfill a Social and Behavioral Science Requirement, but it will help you become a more informed citizen in our democracy.

This course is taught by Dr. Laurel Elder, Department of Political Science.


POSC 340: Media and Politics
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This upper level course is open to students from all majors who are interested in learning about the essential role of media in our democracy. In this course we will critically analyze contemporary news media including its constitutional and legal protections, government regulations, as well as the economic and political pressure the news media faces. We will analyze the effect of the news media on the knowledge and attitudes of citizens,  the dynamics and outcomes of elections, the behavior of politicians, and the policies that our government does and does not enact.  I will offer this course for WL3 credit.

This course is taught by Dr. Laurel Elder, Department of Political Science.


SOCI 105: Introduction to Sociology
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

What is Sociology? How do sociologists go about their work? Sociology offers a distinctive perspective on human behavior. The links between personal experience and wider social forces are explored while covering the main fields of the discipline.

The course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.

Session 2 – July 2 to July 27, 2018
 

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
BUSA 230: Organizational Behavior
CISC 160: Business Computing
ENGL 200: Business Writing
GLST 160: Introduction to Global Studies
MUED 251: Music and the Brain

MUSI 176: Rock Music History
PHIL 150: Healthcare Ethics
PHYS 121: Astronomy
RELS 150: Women and Religion (cross-listed
with SOCI 250: Women and Religion)
SOCI  250: Sociology of Horror: Zombies & Monsters in Popular Culture
SOCI 250: Women and Religion (cross-listed 
with RELS 150: Women and Religion)

Registration Payment

BIOL 207: Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 credits, Physical and Life Sciences lab
Prerequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 206)

How are the various organ systems—such as the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems—in the human body put together? How do the systems work together to make sure the whole body functions the way it should? What happens when a body system or a group of body systems fails to work properly, such as failures that might result in a stroke or heart attack? If these questions intrigue you, this course may be of interest to you.

This course is taught Dr. A. J. Russo, Department of Biology.


BUSA 230: Organizational Behavior
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

Understanding the ways that individuals and groups interact can be critical to addressing the challenges faced by any organization. For example, why would employees interfere with an organization’s efforts to improve? One possibility: fear. Fear of change, of losing a job, of losing relevance. Organizational behavior refers to the ways individuals and groups interact within and toward an organization. Combined behaviors create a company climate that can bolster or undermine an organization’s success. To understand organizational behavior we must try to understanding how individuals, groups, and organizational structures interact and affect one another. A detailed look at workplace behavior, business culture, and organizational practices can generate greater insights about communication patterns, for example, or where conflict comes from. In this class students learn to understand organizational behavior, and how to be that manager who sparks solution-oriented policies and leads positive organizational change.

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration & Accounting.


CISC 160: Business Computing
3 credits

A literacy course providing an introduction to the nature and use of computers and software in a business environment. Topics include information processing and the use of computers in problem-solving in the business world. Students learn to use the intermediate features of word processor, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software to solve business problems and present their findings. This course is for students not planning to major or minor in computer science. (QFR)

This course is taught by Kyle Britton, Department of Computer and Information Sciences.


ENGL 200: Business Writing
3 credits

This course teaches strategies of effective, tactful writing in a business setting. Students will practice writing memos, letters and brief reports and discussing challenges, strategies, and problem solving in a group (corporate) setting. The course covers internal organizational communication as well as external communications with customers, clients or other firms or agencies. Does not count toward the English major or toward the minor in literature.

This course taught by Martin Christiansen, Department of English.


GLST 160: Introduction to Global Studies
3 credits, Arts & Humanities, Foreign Language

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary perspectives on global systems using concepts such as diversity, tradition, hybrid or blended identities, and tolerance. It seeks to help students find ways to work respectfully and productively in an interconnected world.  Students who complete this course and either 101 or 102 in CHIN, FREN, GERM, RUSS or SPAN will fulfill the language requirement.

This course is taught by Dr. Mark Wolff, Department of Modern Languages.


MUED 251: Music and the Brain
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

The purpose of this course is to provide participants with a basic understanding of neuroscience research in music, or the impact of music on the brain. This course will explore the science behind music making and listening to music, why songs get stuck in your head, how restaurants can use music to manipulate how you eat, the impact of music on our mood, the impact of music on learning, how music can develop and strengthen your memory, and whether or not music makes you smarter. We will look into studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging to see how neuroscientists have been researching the impact music has on brain activity. We will consider the importance of music therapy and lifelong learning in music. There are no prerequisites for this course.

This course is taught by Dr. Meghan Sheehy, Department of Music.


 

MUSI 176: Rock Music History
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

Popular culture rocks our cradle, permeates society, and our interaction with others. The powers that be attempt to electrify our surroundings with high voltage presentations of their products and jolt our necessity for them. Without us knowing it, they can manipulate our tastes and perceptions of ourselves.

While surveying American history and culture through the lens of popular music, this course allows students to create a personal response to the music around them, past and present. Students will offer personal input into the class through concert reviews, discussions of performances and performers, and appraisals of Pop Culture.

This course is taught by Stephen Markuson, Music Department.


PHIL 150: Healthcare Ethics
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

The aim of this course is to explore some of the complex ethical and political issues surrounding healthcare in the 21st-century. After a quick introduction to ethical theory, the course is organized into three broad areas of inquiry: (1) issues concerning individuals (euthanasia, cloning technology, genetic engineering); (2) issues concerning medical organizations (ethical issues in emergency medicine, the use of ethics consultation, the place of spiritual beliefs in treatment); and (3) issues concerning healthcare policy and public health (healthcare inequality, the ethics of disaster relief, the ethics of universal health care). Students will also have the opportunity to discuss topics of their own choosing in the final week of the course. Course assignments: participation in discussion boards, weekly exams, and a final paper.

This course is taught by Dr. Jeremy Wisnewski, Department of Philosophy.


PHYS 121: Astronomy
4 credits, Physical & Life Sciences (lab)

Have you ever looked up at the sky at night and wondered about the lives of those twinkly points of light in the sky? Have you ever wanted to take pictures of the birthplaces of those lights in the sky? Do you think you would enjoy using robot-controlled telescopes or participating in studies using pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope and other state-of-the-art devices? Finally, would you like do those things from the comfort of your home and in your pajamas? If you answered yes to any of those questions and are looking to complete a laboratory course, then PHYS 121: Astronomy online is just the thing for you.

This course is taught by Dr. Kevin Schultz, Department of Physics.


RELS 150: Women and Religion
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

Religion has an essential effect on the development of any society since it impacts religious norms and models of behavior, establishes priorities and values, influences gender relations, predetermines roles, and influences the establishing certain traditions, laws, and customs. This course focuses on the role of women in five of the world’s major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the traditional theological principles and the practical laws that have directly impacted women and women’s lives within these religious traditions. Specifically, this course will explore how women from different parts of the world have been treated as members of various religious groups, how women have practiced religion, and how their beliefs and life experience have differed from those of men. This course may be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Women’s and Gender studies minor. This course cross-listed with SOCI-250: Women and Religion.

This course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.


SOCI 250: Sociology of Horror: Zombies & Monsters in Popular Culture
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

Zombies, vampires, slashers, and aliens – what is it about us, as a society, that voyeuristically draws us to these terrifying accounts of human fear, torment and slaughter? Why do we want to watch vampires engaged in the nocturnal pursuit of fresh blood, a chainsaw murder in an abandoned barn, or zombies feeding on a recent kill? Some have argued that what lies beneath the appeal are deep rooted tensions related to misogyny, sexual arousal and violence, resistance against modern capitalism, or our external fears of plague, chemical warfare, or even radiation. In this course, we will survey the four main horror genres: vampire, slasher, alien/science fiction, and zombie/apocalypse to think about these films, through a sociological lens. We will view pairs of films – one that examines the traditional genre narrative and a second that challenges these expectations to confront gender and sexual dynamics and also pushes against the politics which police social norms and cultural expression.

This course is taught by Dr. Amber Tierney, Department of Sociology


SOCI 250: Women & Religion
3 credits, Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course focuses on the role of women in five of the world’s major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the traditional theological principles and the practical laws that have directly impacted women and women’s lives within these religious traditions. After successful completion of this course the students will be able to: understand some of the major world religions and what roles women played in them; discuss some of the religious traditions and how they have affected women, evaluate the influence of religion on gender roles and relations; recognize how women in the contemporary world are reinterpreting their religious traditions. This course may be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Women’s and Gender studies minor. This course cross-listed with RELS-150: Women and Religion. Prerequisite: None

This course is taught by Dr. Elena Chernyak, Department of Sociology.

Session 3 – July 30 to August 24, 2018
 

ARTH 104: World Art History III: Art of the Modern World
BIOL 150: Topics in Biology/Medical Terminology
BUSA 381: Human Resources
MATH 100: Algebra Review
MUSI 250: Roots of American Music

SOCI 250: Crime Scene Investigation
SOCI 285: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Registration Payment

ARTH 104: World Art History III: Art of the Modern World
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

This course surveys the major artistic developments from the 18th century to the present day in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas. The purpose of the course is to foster an understanding of the relationship between works of art and the historical, political, religious, and philosophical context of the societies that produced and made use of them, to explore human cultural diversity, and to build the fundamental skills of visual analysis and the critical concepts and vocabulary necessary for discussing works of art verbally and in writing. No prerequisites.

 This course is taught by Dr. Doug Zullo, Department of Art and Art History.


BIOL 150: Topics in Biology/Medical Terminology
3 credits, Physical and Life Sciences

This course introduces students to the language used by health-care practitioners, with special attention to the needs of nurses. Students will gain a solid foundation in medical language covering body systems, disease, health, wellness, diagnostics and more. 3 credits. Prerequisite: None

This course is taught by Dr. Joshua Garrett, Department of Biology.


BUSA 281: Human Resources.
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

A survey course of Human Resource Management (HRM) functions, including strategic HRM planning, job analysis, staffing, compensation, training and development, performance assessment, benefits, and labor relations. Discusses the interrelationships and ethical dimensions of human resource decisions within HR and across other functional areas within the organization. Prerequisite: BUSA 230

This course is taught by Dr. Pauline Stamp, Department of Business Administration and Accounting.


MATH 100: Algebra Review
2 credits

Intended to provide the background necessary for Math 120 Precalculus. Topics covered include properties of real numbers, exponents, and radicals; operations involving polynomials and other algebraic expressions; solving equations and inequalities. Other topics may be included if time permits. The course should be taken only by students who intend to take Math 120 Precalculus. This course cannot be used to satisfy QFR requirement and does not count toward a mathematics major or minor.

This course taught by Dr. Min Chung, Department of Mathematics.


MUSI 250: Roots of American Music
3 credits, Arts & Humanities

This course introduces the history and common practices of  multiple American music genres from their conception to the present. Students will learn about the principle trends, sounds, and stylistic developments within the history of American music; genres such as Blues, Country, Jazz, and Rock n Roll. We will study major performers, arrangers, and innovators, throughout the term with the emphasis on sound rather than theoretical principles.

This course is taught by Dr. Jeremy Kellett, Department of Music.


SOCI 250: Crime Scene Investigation
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This course will focus on the collection, identification and analysis of crime scene evidence. Case studies and current events will be explored though out the course.  Students will become familiar with various forensic methods for collecting the evidence, cleaning the crime scene, making positive identifications, and the technology used in service to these activities. The course will consist of formal lectures and class discussions.

This course is taught by Dr. Barbara Smith, Department of Sociology.


SOCI 285: Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 credits, Social & Behavioral Sciences

This course is designed to introduce students to the American criminal justice system and the role of the police, the courts, and correctional facilities within that system. It focuses on the history and the primary duties of our justice system in America while briefly introducing conceptions of justice as well as definitions of, measurement of, and causes of crime. Within the detailed discussions of the police, the courts, and corrections particular attention is paid to current debates within each of these criminal justice agencies.

This course is taught by Dr. Ryan Ceresola, Department of Sociology.

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