Kyle Burke, Assistant Professor of History and Peace & Conflict Studies Co-Coordinator

331 Golisano Hall
burkek@hartwick.edu
607-431-4883

Areas of expertise:
modern US and global history; war and society; radicalism and political violence
Education:
Ph.D., Northwestern University

An award-winning teacher, Professor Burke offers classes across the spectrum of US and global history. They include: the United States since 1968, Sex and Gender in US History, the Global Cold War, American Empire, the Vietnam War, the History of US Foreign Relations, and Political Extremism in the 20th Century, as well as introductory surveys of US history and global history. Beyond the classroom, he enjoys advising student research and teaching programs.

Professor Burke’s scholarship examines the tangled histories of war, political violence, and radicalism in the United States and the wider world. His articles, essays, and reviews have appeared in Jacobin, Diplomatic History, H-War, and H-Diplo.

His first book, Revolutionaries for the Right: Anticommunist Internationalism and Paramilitary Warfare in the Cold War, was published by University of North Carolina Press in June 2018. Utilizing previously untapped sources from four continents, it chronicles the rise and fall of an international network of right-wing organizations that supported anticommunist guerrillas in the global south from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Professor Burke is currently at work on a new book tentatively titled White Power Worldwide. It explores the creation and mobilization of a trans-Atlantic white supremacist movement since the 1970s. Tacking between the United States and Europe, it shows how white power activists raised money, circulated texts, and targeted common enemies through similar modes of violence. Although white power activists said they were fighting globalization—and are often portrayed as such—they too harnessed new technologies and transnational flows of people, ideas, and capital. Therefore, White Power Worldwide argues they must be understood not as opponents of globalization but as beneficiaries.

His research has been supported with fellowships from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations and the Buffett Institute for Global Studies.

Recent courses taught:

  • The United States and the Global Cold War
  • Global History since 1750: The Age of Carbon
  • The United States since 1968
  • The Vietnam War
  • American Empire
  • The History of US Foreign Relations
  • Political Extremism in the 20th Century
  • Sex and Gender in US History
  • Race and Ethnicity in America
  • 20th-Century US History through Film
  • US-Latin American Relations
  • American Political History

Distinctions (awards, fellowships, and grants):

  • Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Fellowship
  • Buffett Institute for Global Studies Fellowship

Selected publications:

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