Paul Patinka, Adjunct Instructor and Artist in Residence

patinkap@hartwick.edu

Areas of expertise:
Western Classical and Contemporary Commercial Voice, Vocal Pedagogy, Voice Science, Musicology, Research Methods
Education:
MM Vocal Performance, University of Delaware, MM Vocal Pedagogy and Performance, the University of Texas at San Antonio, Certificate in Vocology, National Center for Voice and Speech

Paul M. Patinka (they/them/Mx.), tenor, has been described by students as “engaging, thoughtful, and thorough” with approaching vocal technique. Their students successfully audition for graduate programs and win awards in various vocal competitions. A functional technique based on the latest research and science incorporating new understandings of old traditions forms the basis of their pedagogy. Their research interests include bridging the intersectional gap between voice science and voice pedagogy to include race, queer, and gender studies.

Paul has sung with Opera San Antonio, The University of Texas at San Antonio, Austin Opera, Opera Delaware, Annapolis Opera, Boheme Opera New Jersey, The University of Delaware, and the Still Breathing Ensemble. They performed as the tenor soloist for the Canticle Cantata, Op. 42 at the Victoria International Arts Festival in Malta, as the tenor soloist with the Catskill Symphony Orchestra on Wolfgang Mozart’s Coronation Mass, and as the tenor soloist with the St. Anthony Choir on Camille Saint-Saëns Oratorio de Noêl, Op. 12, the St. Anthony Mass, and again on the Coronation Mass.

A frequent recitalist, Paul enjoys delving into underperformed works and underrepresented composers. Their most recent recitals include celebrations of European Women, American women, and works based on the four seasons in 12 languages, as well as a new piece written in Arabic by D.H. Ringey to combat islamophobia. A particularly enthusiastic lover of chamber works, Paul has performed Franz Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin, Op. 25, Ralph Vaughan Williams Along the Field, and a myriad of chamber works and song cycles.

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