Pre-engineering Program

Hartwick’s pre-engineering program allows you to try out other majors while still remaining on track for an engineering degree.

Students in the pre-engineering program study at Hartwick for three or four years before applying to cooperative programs at Clarkson University or Columbia University.

Where a background in pre-engineering can take you.

To prepare for an engineering college, you’ll need to take specific courses in basic math and physics, as well as others geared toward the type of engineering you decide to pursue.

If you decide not to continue the pre-engineering program, you will graduate with your Hartwick major in three (three-year degree program) or four years.

A closer look.

You’ll have a pre-engineering advisor and a major advisor who will help you with your academic and career paths. You’ll graduate from Hartwick with the education necessary to continue toward a bachelor’s of science in engineering in an additional two years.

Beyond the basic.

One way to explain the difference between engineers and scientists in a few words is that an engineer asks “How does it work?” while a scientist asks “Why does it work?” A scientist is more concerned with understanding nature at a fundamental level, while an engineer is more interested in applying that knowledge to design a better machine.

Putting pre-engineering to work.

Hartwick pre-engineering students go on to have meaningful careers. They thrive at some of the finest engineering schools in the nation. Hartwick graduates are working at Apple Computer, Shiavone Construction Company, Israel-Berger and Associates, SICK Sensor Technology, The Chazen Companies, The SM Group International, and Synaptive Medical, to name a few.

Meet the pre-engineering faculty.

Our distinguished faculty are dedicated to giving tomorrow’s scientific professionals the tools to make an impact the moment they graduate.

Larry Nienart
Professor and Department Chair, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo
Areas of focus:
general relativity, mathematical physics, electronics and analog computers.


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