Modern Languages Courses

French Courses

The French program at Hartwick prepares students to live and learn in French-speaking communities throughout the world. Class sizes are kept small to ensure close, one-on-one collaboration between students and professors.

01, 102 Elementary French I and II

The Elementary French I and II sequence is designed to help students develop basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing while introducing students to the culture of France and the francophone world. Prerequisite: consult with French staff except where student has had absolutely no prior French, in which case there is no prerequisite. (101 LN1, 102 LN2) (3 credits)

105 Intensive Elementary French

This course is offered off-campus during January Term. It is designed to help students develop basic communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing while introducing students to the culture of France and the francophone world. Prerequisite: placement test, unless student has had absolutely no prior French. (LN3: this course alone fulfills the LAiP language requirement; no other course is required) (OCL, EL) (4 credits) 

201 Intermediate French I

 This course offers students the opportunity to reinforce and expand previous learning in vocabulary, grammar and comprehension. Unlike earlier courses, this one focuses upon giving the student an idiomatic grasp of French. Oral practice, language laboratory. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent. (LN3) (3 credits)

202 Intermediate French II

This course continues the focus upon the fluency and idiomatic use of French. Selected readings will be used to study literary tenses and to increase vocabulary. The course will include conversations, discussions, compositions to improve language skills and comprehension. Prerequisite: FREN 201 is normally taken before 202. (3 credits)

205 Intensive Intermediate French  

This course is offered off-campus during January Term. Students learn to create ways through oral and written communication to handle a wide variety of topics in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Prerequisite: placement test. (LN3, OCL, EL) (4 credits)

210 Conversation and Composition

 A beginning conversation course to develop fluency, vocabulary and pronunciation. Where needed, occasional grammar review. Conversation topics will relate to French life and culture. Some use of language laboratory. A useful preparation for off-campus programs in French-speaking locations. Taught in French. Prerequisites: FREN 202 or permission of instructor. (3 credits)

235 French for Business

A study of French business practices, commercial writing and terminology. Readings, videos and class discussion will address French commerce and business etiquette, France’s role in the European Union and its attempts to face future economic challenges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or permission of the instructor. Offered on an occasional basis. (3 credits) 

305 Intensive Advanced French 

This course is offered off-campus during January Term. Students will develop skills in manipulating more sophisticated grammar and vocabulary to support opinions on a variety of cultural, social and historical issues. Prerequisite: placement test. (OCL, EL, LN3) (4 credits) 

347 Le cinéma français 

This course is an introduction to major works of French cinema from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the 1990s. We will explore how films convey their messages, how they respond to the social concerns of the time when they were made, and how we can understand them today. (3 credits)

350 La culture francophone

This course offers a survey of the geography, history, and culture of France and the Francophone world. (3 credits)

490 Senior Project

Required of all majors. A thesis or other appropriate work which demonstrates the student’s proficiency in French. (3 credits)


Spanish Courses

Knowledge of the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures is becoming increasingly advantageous in many careers. The Spanish major at Hartwick is designed to develop students’ fluency in oral and written language skills, and cultural competence.

101 Beginning Spanish I

This is a beginner’ s course that emphasizes the acquisition of grammatical structures and vocabulary using the communicative method. Spanish will be the language of instruction. The course focuses on listening comprehension, pronunciation, and cultural knowledge. Students are expected to attend class regularly and participate in all class activities. Prerequisite: Course is designed for students who have had no previous experience in Spanish, have had less than two years of Spanish in high school, or score at a 101 level in the placement exam. The course instructor has the discretion to move the student to another course based on initial class performance. (3 credits) 

102 Beginning Spanish II

A continuation of SPAN 101, which focuses on the active development of listening and reading comprehension, cultural knowledge, and speaking and writing skills taught through the communicative method. Spanish will be the language of instruction. Students will continue to study cultural elements of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or students with two or more years of Spanish in high school with Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. The course instructor has the discretion to move the student to another course based on initial class performance. (OCL) (3 credits) 

150 Topics in Hispanic Studies

Stresses the unique historical, linguistic, cultural, and traditional differences of individual areas of the Hispanic World. If this course is offered during the term preceding a trip abroad, it will deal with the area to be visited. Students may repeat the course when the title and content change. (LNC) (3 credits)

160 Introduction to Regional Hispanic Study 

What is the first thing that comes to mind when I say “Spanish”? What imagery does Latin America evoke? Who or what do you imagine when you hear the words Latino, Spaniard, and Hispanic? Do you know how many languages are spoken in Spain, or the significance of Al-Andalus? Do you understand how U.S. policies impact immigration and continue to inform our dialogue on the subject? Do you recognize how media has shaped your own assumptions and perceptions? In this course we will endeavor to answer these questions and many more. We will challenge our preconceived notions and gain a better understanding of the heterogeneous cultural landscape of the Spanish-speaking world. Through a general overview of the main socio-political, cultural, and regional topics of today’s Latin America and Spain, we will evaluate the historical and cultural influences that shaped these regions. We will examine how the linguistic and political legacies transmitted by the Spaniards during the conquest and colonization shaped Latin America, and how the enterprise of conquest and colonialism in turn shaped Spain. Through an interdisciplinary approach to the history and cultures of Spain and the Americas we will explore how Hispanic cultures have been influenced by common histories, reciprocal relationships, collaboration and conflicts. This exploration will take place through film, literature, current news, history, music and scholarly articles. All students will be encouraged to contribute their unique research interests and perspectives so we can engage in a lively and meaningful conversation. Prerequisite: None Curricular Designation: Spanish Culture course can be used towards the Foreign Language requirement OR towards the Humanities divisional requirement. (3 credits)

201 Intermediate Spanish I

This course is a continuation of SPAN 102 and offers the student an opportunity to reinforce and expand previous learning in grammar, comprehension, oral and written skills, and vocabulary through the communicative method. This course also focuses on giving the student an idiomatic grasp of the language and continues to expose students to a variety of cultural components related to the Spanish-speaking world. SPAN 201 should be taken the semester immediately following SPAN 102. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or with Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. (3 credits)

202 Intermediate Spanish II

This intermediate level course is the gatekeeper which will determine if students will be invited to pursue advanced studies in Spanish. Grammar and vocabulary will be taught in context through the reading, listening, viewing, and analysis of cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world. This course will go more in depth in grammatical points in order to help students manipulate them with more precision in written and oral assignments related to the historical, social, and cultural contexts of various Spanish-speaking countries and regions. Oral proficiency is strongly emphasized. A final grade of B+ is required in order to continue toward a major. Prerequisite: Span 201 or with Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. (3 credits) 

203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish

This course will emphasize written and oral communication in Spanish for academic purposes. Students will learn to conduct textual analysis and literary criticism through a variety of texts and other forms of cultural production in preparation for upper-level Spanish courses. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. (3 credits) 

204 Panoramas del pasado y el presente peninsular y de las américas 

In this course, students will acquire a general sense of the history and cultures of what today comprises the Spanish-speaking world. Students will learn about important political and social periods that impacted these regions as a whole (such as the Muslim rule of Spain, the conquest, pre-Columbian civilizations, the colonial period and independence movements in Latin America) as well as focusing on the particulars of a select group of countries. Reading, writing, textual analysis, and formal presentation skills will be emphasized. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. (3 credits)

240 Spanish for the Professions

This course is intended to bridge the communication gap between Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. and the English-speaking individuals that interact with them in various professional fields. The course will focus on developing the oral skills, vocabulary, grammar and cultural knowledge required to better serve Spanish-speaking individuals in one of the following professional settings: healthcare, legal, social services, community or business. The professional field of focus will vary. When possible, this course should be taken in the semester immediately following SPAN 102. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or Spanish faculty approval and placement exam. When repeated, this course bears the numbers 241 or 242. (3 credits) 

245 Topics in Spanish for the Professions

 Project-based course in professional Spanish done under the supervision of an instructor in a specialized area according to the student’s area of interest. Possible specializations include healthcare, legal, social services, community or business. The student must combine the project with an internship or apprenticeship in an appropriate organization, such as a health center, courthouse, international corporation, government or non-governmental agency, or school. Prerequisite: SPAN 240 Spanish for the Professions (3 credits)

250, 350, 450 Seminar in Hispanic Studies

 A seminar in a selected topic of Spanish language, literature, or civilization. Occasionally the course is taught in English. (3 credits)

285/385/485 Spanish Term Abroad

 A study-abroad program offered by the Spanish section of the language department. (OCL, LNC, EL) (4 credits)

319/419 La cultura popular 

Through the analysis of telenovelas, music, and film, we will discuss what these modes of popular culture say about a particular society. We will look at how these forms of cultural expressions convey conflicts between classes, gender and ethnic groups, and what these popular cultural productions say about the relationship between a specific society in the Spanish speaking world and the outside world. The texts for this course will be the forms of popular cultures themselves to provide students the opportunity to create with the language. May be repeated for credit. When repeated, this course bears the number 320 or 321. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish or Spanish faculty approval. (3 credits)

327/427 Themes or Genres

 A study of a recurrent theme or specific genre. Possible topics include: National identity, Nationalism, Gender and Sexuality, Space and borders. May be repeated for credit. When repeated, this course bears the numbers 328 or 329. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish or Spanish faculty approval. (3 credits)

335/435 El cine hispánico

In this course, students will analyze several representative films from Spain, Latin America, and the U.S. by such directors as Bunuel, Almodovar, Gutierrez Alea, Littin, Bemberg, and Solas. Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Robert Rodriguez, Gregory Nava, Pilar Miró, Iciar Bollaín. All films will be studied as social, historical, and cultural texts. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish or Spanish faculty approval. (3 credits)

340 Translation Studies 

In this course students will be introduced to Translation as Profession, Theory and Practice. Students will explore aspects relating to context and negotiating meaning, audience, register and regionalisms. The course will offer an introduction to translating texts in various contexts and of different types including commercial and financial, legal and political, medical, scientific and technical, literary, cultural and marketing texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish or Spanish faculty approval. (3 credits)

400 Literary Theory

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the writings of philosophers, scientists, and other theorists of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries whose works have influenced the world of literature and literary criticism. In this course, we will read theoretical texts in order to acquire the tools that may enable us to do literary and cultural criticism through the lens of theory. Theory may include: structuralism/post structuralism, deconstruction, gender and queer theory, Critical Race Theory, etc. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SPAN 203 Advanced Written and Oral Communication in Spanish or Spanish faculty approval. (3 credits) 

489 Senior Project Seminar 

This 1-credit course in preparation for the Senior Project will give students the opportunity to begin work on their thesis topic. Through this class, students will prepare their statements of purpose, bibliographies (including annotated bibliographies), outlines, and various drafts of their thesis before signing up for SPAN 490. (1 credit)

490 Senior Project

Required of all majors. A thesis or other appropriate work that demonstrates the student’s proficiency in Spanish. (3 credits)


Global Studies Courses

The global studies major at Hartwick is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate effectively in at least one language other than English, know how to navigate cultural diversity, recognize the interconnections between local and global issues, travel abroad to experience what they are learning, and make their own unique contributions to increased global understanding.

160 Introduction to Global Studies

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary perspectives on global systems using concepts such as diversity, tradition, hybrid or blended identities, and tolerance. It seeks to help students find ways to work respectfully and productively in an interconnected world. (LNC) (3 credits)

489/490 Global Studies Senior Thesis

The senior thesis offers students the opportunity to explore a particular issue that deeply interests them. It should represent a culmination of their learning as a global studies major in a liberal arts college. In completing the thesis, students should draw on a broad range of courses they have taken, works they have read, and ideas they have encountered. (4 credits)

Global studies courses offered by various departments at least every other year include:

  • ANTH 105 Introduction to Anthropology
  • ANTH 223 Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 237 Peoples and Cultures
  • ANTH 335 Third World Studies
  • ANTH 340 Primate Behavior and Ecology
  • ANTH 341 Cultural Ecology
  • ARTH 104 World Art History III: Art of the Modern World
  • ARTH 203 Art of the Andes
  • ARTH 280 Topics in Buddhist Art
  • ARTH 301 Greek and Roman Art
  • ARTH 302 Medieval Art
  • ARTH 303 Italian Renaissance Art
  • ARTH 304 Baroque Art
  • ARTH 306 Twentieth-Century Art
  • ARTH 307 Art and Architecture of Italy
  • ARTH 308 Contemporary Art: 1965 to the Present
  • ARTH 401 Northern Renaissance Art
  • ARTH 403 Nineteenth-Century Art
  • BUSA 350 Doing Business in Asia: China
  • BUSA 441 International Business
  • CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese 1
  • CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese 2
  • ECON 221 Microeconomic Theory
  • ECON 222 Macroeconomic Theory
  • ECON 314 Development and Transition
  • ECON 320 International Economic Policy
  • FREN 101 Elementary French I
  • FREN 102 Elementary French II
  • FREN 201 Intermediate French I
  • FREN 202 Intermediate French II
  • FREN 300+ Upper-level French course
  • GERM 101 Beginning German I
  • GERM 102 Beginning German II
  • HIST 104 US Ethnic Studies
  • HIST 162 Human Civilization and the Natural World since 1500
  • HIST 202 Modern Latin America
  • HIST 213 Europe in the 20th Century
  • HIST 225 History of Brazil
  • HIST 326 Gender and Power in Latin America
  • HIST 378 American Foreign Relations
  • MUSI 280 Music of the World’s Cultures
  • PHIL 336 EthicsPOSC 105 International RelationsPOSC 108 Intro to Comparative Politics
  • POSC 215 International Organizations
  • POSC 218 Central Asian Politics
  • POSC 228 EU Politics
  • POSC 245 The Model UN
  • POSC 288 African Politics
  • POSC 305 Comparative Foreign Policy
  • POSC 308 Seminar in Comparative Politics
  • POSC 328 Women, Politics and Development
  • POSC 335 International Law
  • POSC 345 Seminar: Global Issues, Global Crises
  • RELS 106 World Religions
  • RELS 221 Hinduism
  • RELS 222 Buddhism
  • RELS 239 Islam
  • RELS 363 Philosophy of Consciousness in India
  • SOCI 105 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI 225 Human Rights
  • SOCI 251 Race and Ethnicity
  • SPAN 101 Introduction to Spanish I
  • SPAN 102 Introduction to Spanish II
  • SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I
  • SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II
  • SPAN 300+ Upper-level Spanish course
  • SPAN 350 The Past is Present: Service Learning in the Dominican Republic
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