Summer is More Fun at Hartwick’s Yager Museum

Hartwick College’s Yager Museum of Art & Culture begins its series of popular summer craft programs for children this Wednesday, June 26, from noon to 3 p.m.

Summer Crafternoons allow children to explore their creativity in the setting of the Museum galleries. The Museum will set up craft tables filled with all the supplies needed for kids to make something brilliant and beautiful! Snacks will also be available to help power participants’ creativity.

Summer Crafternoons are free and no reservation is needed. An adult will be required to accompany children during the programs, however.
Each week, there will be a new theme and some supplies specific to that theme, but budding artists may make any kind of art they choose. This season’s weekly themes are:

  • June 26 – Picture Messages
  • July 3 – Tapestry
  • July 10 – Landscapes
  • July 17 – Paper Chain
  • July 24 – Ships
  • July 31 – Pots

Several exhibitions will also be on view at the Yager during the summer, including:

  • Silent Lakes & Flashing Rivers: 20th Century Fishing Cultures in Temagami follows museum founder Willard Yager’s 1911 trip to northeastern Ontario and looks at region through the eyes of its First Nations inhabitants, Canadian entrepreneurs and tourist.
  • Black Lives at Hartwick Then and Now explores the history of African-Americans and African-American Life at Hartwick Seminary and Hartwick College from the 19th century to the present. The exhibition features photos and documents from the College’s Paul F. Cooper Jr., Archives and artifacts from the Museum collections.
  • Contested Identities: Images of Native Americans, 1880-1930, draws on compelling photographs from the Museum’s Falconer Collection to illustrate the struggles of Native Americans to retain their cultural identities in the face of government efforts to assimilate them into the general American culture.
  • Of Time and the River: 12,000 Years in the Upper Susquehanna Region, which features many Native American artifacts collected by the Museum’s founder and namesake.
  • Masterpieces of European and American Art: Hartwick College’s Art Treasure Room, a permanent exhibition of works ranging from the Italian Renaissance to 20th century pieces by Rockwell Kent and Childe Hassam.
  • Earth Water Sky: Landscapes from the Museum Collections includes art of varied media, styles and time periods.
  • Sculptures in Silver: America’s Standing Liberty Quarters, 1916-1931, displays one of the most artistic coins minted by the United States, as designed by Hermon Atkins McNeil.

The Yager is the Oneonta area’s only museum of art and culture. It is open Wednesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. from June 1 through July 31, after which it will be open by appointment only until the start of the College’s Fall Term. During the summer, the Museum is closed Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays and College holidays. Admission is free and parking is available near the entrance on the first floor of Yager Hall. To reach the Museum, take West Street to Clinton Street and turn right onto Cayuga Drive. Follow Cayuga Drive to Yager Hall.  Parking is available adjacent to the Museum entrance.

For more information on The Yager and these exhibitions, visit the museum’s website or Facebook page, call 607-431-4480, or e-mail Kendall at kendalld@hartwick.edu.

Hartwick College is a private liberal arts and sciences college of 1,200 students, located in Oneonta, NY, in the northern foothills of the Catskill Mountains. Hartwick’s expansive curriculum emphasizes an experiential approach to the liberal arts. Through personalized teaching, collaborative research, a distinctive January Term, a wide range of internships, and vast study-abroad opportunities, Hartwick ensures that students are prepared for not just their first jobs, but for the world ahead. A Three-Year Bachelor’s Degree Program and strong financial aid and scholarship offerings keep a Hartwick education affordable.

Contact:     David Lubell
E-mail:        lubelld@hartwick.edu
Phone:        607-431-4031

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