History Faculty

Chad Anderson, Visiting Assistant Professor of History
Ph.D., University of California at Davis
Areas of expertise: Early American, Native American Societies, Environmental History

Cherilyn Lacy, Professor of History & Coordinator of Public Health Program
Ph.D., University of Chicago
lacyc@hartwick.edu
Areas of expertise: Modern Europe, Women and Gender, Medicine and Public Health
What happens to civilians if most of a country’s doctors, nurses, and other medical resources are channeled toward a war effort? This is the focus of Dr. Lacy’s current research project on civilian healthcare in France during the First World War.

Harry Bradshaw Matthews, Associate Dean and Director of Office of Intercultural Affairs, Founding President of USCTI
M.A., Northern Michigan University
Areas of expertise: African-Americans of the Civil War through World War II, Family History Research, Anti-slavery Movement and the Underground Railroad

Mieko Nishida, Professor of History and Department Chair of History
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University
nishidam@hartwick.edu
Areas of expertise: Latin America, Brazil, social history
A graduate of Hiroshima University (BA in American Studies) and the University of Tsukuba (MA in Latin American Studies), both in Japan, Mieko Nishida received her MA and Ph.D. in History from The Johns Hopkins University. 

Edythe Ann Quinn, Professor of History
Ph.D., University of Tennessee at Knoxville
quinne@hartwick.edu
Areas of expertise: Contemporary America, U.S. Women, Race and Ethnicity, Civil Rights Movement, Immigration, Environmental History, U.S. Foreign Relations

Peter G. Wallace, Professor of History
Ph.D., University of Oregon
wallacep@hartwick.edu
Areas of expertise: Medieval and Early Modern European History
Dr. Wallace has taught and mentored students at Hartwick for over thirty years. He particularly relishes working individually with students as they research and write their senior theses. He has published a well-respected history of the European Reformation, which in 2018 will appear in a 3rd edition. His archival research has focused on the changing political identities in the early modern Upper Rhine valley, which became a borderland for three emerging states: France, Switzerland, and Germany.

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